And so it begins...
Last Post 12 Mar 2013 02:25 AM by ClaytonR. 37 Replies.
Author Messages
magmamUser is Offline
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Send Private Message
Posts:642
magmam

--
01 Mar 2013 01:18 PM
    Old Guard2User is Offline
    Moderator / Trusted Member
    Forum Supreme!
    Forum Supreme!
    Send Private Message
    Posts:14360
    Old Guard2

    --
    01 Mar 2013 03:55 PM
    Flyovers of sporting events and multiple Blue Angels and Thunderbirds shows have TV this morning this could take months to be felt... I have a feeling we will feel it a whole lotta sooner than he predicts. I just hope it doesn't mess up my travel this weekend. I'm off to NYC tomorrow, on to Connecticut for the bridal shower Sunday and back home on Monday. This is gong to effect TSA and FAA and ATC. I don't particularly care for Wisconsin but I can't get stuck in NJ! Oh boy... let the games begin.
    Sector NY, Staten Island
    CoochUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Moderator
    Moderator
    Send Private Message
    Posts:5304
    Cooch

    --
    01 Mar 2013 04:12 PM
    I'm fine with eliminating non-essential, and wasteful spending. The sequestration might have just as many positives as it does negatives.
    You can meet the standard, or you can set the standard. It's your choice.
    Old Guard2User is Offline
    Moderator / Trusted Member
    Forum Supreme!
    Forum Supreme!
    Send Private Message
    Posts:14360
    Old Guard2

    --
    01 Mar 2013 05:15 PM
    Sorry, but I don't see those things as wasteful. Non-essential, I'll give you that one. But not wasteful. They act as great recruiting tools and air shows draw huge attendance, where admission is charged, souvenirs are sold, vendors sell their items and money is spent. That seems to be not so wasteful as profitable, for many, including the military.
    Sector NY, Staten Island
    jaycatonUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:106
    jaycaton

    --
    01 Mar 2013 05:44 PM
    According to this article the USCG is looking at $439 million in cuts and would "have to curtail surface and air operations by 25 percent, leading to reduced effectiveness of operations and a deferral of maintenance and training."

    http://marthasvineyard.patch.com/ar...ation-cuts
    magmamUser is Offline
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:642
    magmam

    --
    01 Mar 2013 10:28 PM
    Old Guard-bridal shower...woo hoo.... have a great time!
    CGNY2013User is Offline
    New Member
    New Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:81
    CGNY2013

    --
    02 Mar 2013 11:56 AM
    Two questions:
    1. Per the Martha's Vineyard Patch article as linked above, what the heck is a "bidget cut?"

    2. Any idea how this would effect the hiring of new AD and Reserve Coasties?

    Scary times.
    "You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream." C. S. Lewis
    CaptNickUser is Offline
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:709
    CaptNick

    --
    02 Mar 2013 11:59 AM
    Im looking forward to the sequester. It will finally curtail the wasteful spending within the organization.
    magmamUser is Offline
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:642
    magmam

    --
    02 Mar 2013 12:24 PM
    I don't so much have a problem with spending cuts as the equity of how those cuts are applied.
    CoochUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Moderator
    Moderator
    Send Private Message
    Posts:5304
    Cooch

    --
    02 Mar 2013 05:34 PM
    I'm with you Nick.

    And my opinion differs when it comes to military bands and air shows. They are "nice to haves", but they are the first thing I would cut. I see them as part of the larger wasteful spending picture.
    You can meet the standard, or you can set the standard. It's your choice.
    JBrazUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:876
    JBraz

    --
    03 Mar 2013 10:01 AM
    My biggest problem is why do we hire a contractor and pay their company say 100k so that they can employ this person to pay them 60k to put them in a job that an E-5 can do? See that often in the IT field.
    ~My destiny is to help others fulfill their destiny~
    JohnnyGUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:107
    JohnnyG

    --
    03 Mar 2013 11:10 AM
    I imagine this military.com article is a little biased, but from Adm. Papp, "Emergencies will be a priority and interdictions of illegal immigrants, drugs and illegal fishing could decline."

    So this goes beyond trimming the fat, and is actually affecting the Coast Guard's mission.


    http://www.military.com/daily-news/...570&rank=8
    DieselUser is Offline
    New Member
    New Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:96
    Diesel

    --
    03 Mar 2013 05:55 PM
    While the flyovers can be seen as wasteful and training hours can be completed in a lot better ways, I do like that it helps show a presence to the the general public. Frankly, I find it pathetic how little the general public is aware of our military. We have almost always lived in a military town, and now that we don't, it is depressing how little people here know and/ or care about our military. They are all ignorant and ungrateful. However, when we have a flyby for a football game, everyone starts talking about supporting the military and what not. It is what it is and yes, a lot more relative training can be completed but I am a little sad to see the flyovers go away for now.

    JBRAZ - I have some family members that are DOD contractors, so I know what you mean. Its nice though when they come to visit... get to do all sorts of stuff I could never afford...
    CoochUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Moderator
    Moderator
    Send Private Message
    Posts:5304
    Cooch

    --
    03 Mar 2013 07:07 PM
    I'm not overly concerned with having public support for our job. I do my job and they do theirs. They appreciate us for the most part. No need for them to go out of their way to show their gratitude.
    You can meet the standard, or you can set the standard. It's your choice.
    Old Guard2User is Offline
    Moderator / Trusted Member
    Forum Supreme!
    Forum Supreme!
    Send Private Message
    Posts:14360
    Old Guard2

    --
    03 Mar 2013 08:34 PM
    Scott, my boyfriend of more than 17 years, joined the Army in 1978. Trust me, you want them to go out of their way to show gratitude. Because it can go back to them spitting on you, like they did him. You want that "love me" feeling. The opposite is heart breaking.
    Sector NY, Staten Island
    KDUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:388
    KD

    --
    03 Mar 2013 10:53 PM
    What I fear is what I see in other government agencies, like the state and county level ones my family deals with daily: that the 'wasteful' spending won't end, while regular old people will get laid off and have their basic pay and benefits cut.

    As JBraz noted, contractors make ridiculous amounts in CA doing IT jobs that never end and always need more money, even though they never accomplish a goal. Meanwhile, DH's deputies are losing their fitness incentive pay, the rest of their employer-paid retirement contributions and their uniform allowance....and all court reserves above 1% are being 'swept' into a state general fund, with about $26 million going to pay for an over-budget new courthouse in Long Beach. A public-private enterprise, thanks much, which you all know is code for 'contractor built'. (Full disclosure: for many years our family business was *contract* investigations for a county public defenders office. We tried to play fair, but there was NO incentive to save anyone else money.)

    The result of that scenario is a frantic spending spree to spend down all the reserves they can before the deadline; they are stockpiling everything from printer paper to ammo, rather than send it south to pay for someone else's pretty courthouse and a contractor's kid's Harvard education.

    Admit it, that sort of waste won't end in the CG either. Why don't FSs cook at ALL galleys? Why don't non-rates take care of basic maintenance everywhere they are stationed? When my son was at A school, the galley at Yorktown took all the BAS for each student; but, being contractor-run, there was every incentive to cut corners and pocket the difference--and it showed in the product. Students voted with their feet and their wheels and took the hit in their budgets to eat ANYwhere else.
    By contrast, he very happily pays out of pocket, daily, to eat at the FS-run galley at his current station.
    I look forward to real cutting of waste.
    If it happens, it will be refreshing, and utterly new.
    FloridaGirlUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:2508
    FloridaGirl

    --
    03 Mar 2013 11:58 PM
    Posted By KD on 03 Mar 2013 11:53 PM


    Admit it, that sort of waste won't end in the CG either. Why don't FSs cook at ALL galleys? Why don't non-rates take care of basic maintenance everywhere they are stationed? 

    KD, when you figure that out, you can be the next Admiral.  In Kodiak, we pay a cleaning service (and I was friendly with one of the ladies, and we pay her "very well") to clean the barrack common areas.  Now, granted we have lots of shipbound nonrates that live there, and petty officers too.  But we have at least a dozen nonrates, if not more, who work "morale".  At the gym, the movie theatre, etc.  Up until recently, they didn't stand duty (they are now being punished because someone got a DUI).  Now, I may have skipped over most of the nonrate thing, but I was unaware that nonrates, or anyone else in the CG, was unable to stand some sort of duty.  I was under the distinct impression that most everyone stood duty.  What's hard about a couple hours of cleaning duty a week?  I don't get it.  I have cleaning duties, darnit.  I shovel snow. I take out trash. Guess what, someone has to. Even I know that my 1 in 4 duty in Petaluma was a cake walk.  You know what the nonrates at Commsta have for duty? Snow plow.  They come in a whole HOUR early IF it snows to clear the parking lot.  That's it.  Yes, they mow, they do the outside maintenance, and I am glad for it.  I usually go help them because it's the right thing to do.  I am not above it.  But, why, WHY do we pay "double" for this stuff?  We have an FS chief who mans the cash register at the base coffee shop.  I'm sure he places orders, and does inventory, and all that stuff too.  But WHY are we paying a chief ring up orders?  He's not using his skills in the best way methinks.
    Honor: if you need it defined, you don’t have it.
    KDUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:388
    KD

    --
    04 Mar 2013 10:33 AM
    Ooooh, I want to be an admiral!
    I could TOTALLY do that.

    DS took duty shifts as a non-rate on 2 different 378s, and busted himself mess cooking too, sometimes 16 hour days. I thought you would work them ALL that hard--they're bought and paid for!! Use 'em!!
    Find out what they can do extra, and use that as well-- DS came out of hs with a welding certificate, and an entire page full of welds he had mastered over four years of Ag Mech classes. I bet he's not the only one. That's pretty cheap labor for apprentice and journey level welding...
    jaycatonUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:106
    jaycaton

    --
    04 Mar 2013 11:38 AM
    Cooch, perhaps its not the gratitude that's important as much as the recognition. What I mean is there needs to be an interest. If no one sees or understands and appreciates the military why would they want to join? Growing up I LOVED going to airshows and watching the Blue Angles, I was fascinated by the big ships, awed by the rescue divers. Seeing these things in a 'public' environment breeds interest in future recruits. Is it needed for 'todays' mission? no, probably not. But it could be critical for tomorrows mission.

    I wont even dredge up the extra support the USCG gets from such things. Maybe no one wants to admit it but there is a huge misunderstanding about what the USCG does and some don't even consider it a branch of the military. A positive, public showing can only help fix such problems.

    All that said, we do have to cut somewhere. But I would rather do it in a manner more like what FloridaGirl and KD are discussing. Use CG to do CG jobs instead of hiring contract employees. IDK, just one outsiders point of view.
    BellsUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:3453
    Bells

    --
    04 Mar 2013 11:50 AM
    Lots of good stuff here:

    I kind of agree that we need to cut spending and the flyovers although sometime entertaining, aren't worth civilians looking at them for an hour or so. There are plenty of things that we can do for free that civilians can take advantage of if they had the interest, for example we have people coming on HEALY for tours all the friggen time, whether thats in port calls or in Seattle, and thats free.

    One of the first things that were cut from the cutter a couple years ago was the cleaning crew that came through to clean common areas and the science berthings. Since that was cut our sweepers and such turned into two days a week sweepers plus for all hands, and then all day Saturday is all hands cleaning. Everyone up to the CMDR and CO are literally in coveralls cleaning the engineering spaces... everything. Did we hate it? Yes. We felt it was a wasteful way to spend our time (to spend the first 2 weeks of 8 hours a day of patrol to allhands clean), because on top of that we still worked on department dependent work that need to be completed. But I am sure the money we saved went towards something useful.

    Could we still do better? Yes. There is still wasteful money that is spent. Like if the galley has extra money they go and buy sh*tty food that has no health value when the 300 something dollars I give them a month for food could easily go to healthy options. Because of this I am usually not eating there.

    For contracted work: for cutters that have 20+ nonrates, yes cut contracted work. Our cutter, the largest cutter in the CG, has 6-7 seaman, on any given morning I have one on watch, and one that is sleeping from mids, then two that are messcooking. So in the end I might have 2-3 available. Are those 2-3 seaman going to go out and paint something while we are underway? No, a job that would normally take a week would take 4. Those 2-3 nonrates are going to be helping the Petty Officers stay on top of collatorals/deck evolutions/science missions while we are underway. So either we need more nonrates so that stuff that is contracted out can get completed in-house, or that stuff is still going to be contracted.

    The almost same exact cutter that will be doing almost the same missions (the Polar Star) has 25 something seaman. How do we only have 6? I have no idea. A 270 has like 12 or 15 or something. We are twice as big as a 378 in square feet. So I don't get how we have half of the work force. Don't worry, the CG is well aware of our problem.

    I will stop talking about it now. Yes we can cut some spending as a cutter, but we also need more resources to get stuff done.
    Take what you like and leave the rest behind.
    KDUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:388
    KD

    --
    04 Mar 2013 11:50 AM
    We have been a military family, a LE family, owned a private business and been self-employed as contractors to a gov't agency and worked in public schools and the California Conservation Corps, as well as businesses like newspapers and large upscale retail ( I know how this sounds...yes, we're nomads, you should see my resume. Never mind , you don't have time.)

    I have never seen any savings of funds or quality improvement that resulted from paying private contractors to do things that should be done in-house. Not ever. There is no incentive for the contractor to save someone else's money, and no improvement of quality when buying from the lowest bidder, for product OR service.
    jaycatonUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:106
    jaycaton

    --
    04 Mar 2013 12:03 PM
    So if we take KDs comment and Bells insight we might be able to meet in the middle by enlarging the recruit requirements. Invest that money paid to private contractors in new recruits. More Coasties, more hands for such work, less need for contractors.
    judoka64User is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:160
    judoka64

    --
    04 Mar 2013 01:10 PM
    @jaycaton if you recruit more coasties then your going to clog up the A schools even more which then employee satisfaction will decrease and you will have a bunch of unhappy nonrates. Plus when you recruit more your going to have to train them which costs money. Plus you have to give them benefits and if they get hurt you have to pay them disability pay for the rest of their lives or you could just contract it out and not have to pay for training and their benefits. Its no win situation all the way around.
    BellsUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:3453
    Bells

    --
    04 Mar 2013 01:45 PM
    No I disagree, we need more of a junior workforce and they need to regulate the senior workforce better which is why a-schools are clogged. They are working on it. The amount contractors get paid is ridiculous, and everything is bidded out and generally we take the lowest bidder which often equals the lowest quality and performers. There also isn't much accountability. Contractots will drag out jobs so that they can get paid overtime, which then equals an entire conttract not getting completed which equals money wasted. We dont get paid overtime, we just make it work.

    I see your point but I would bet if someone was able to work out the numbers, if junior people were able to do more of the contracted work, it would be cheaper just because of all the bs that is cut out.

    And honestly, being a nonrate in the CG isn't even a hard life. Everything is based on perspective. You might not have the most glamorous job but its a freakin job. If it takes 2-3 years to advance you had a job during that time so you should be ok with it. Its one of those things where if your having a bad or stupid day at work "and this isn't what I signed up for", you just have to remind yohrself that theres probably a few hundred thousand people that have it worse off, and we as a people are just pretty spoiled.
    Take what you like and leave the rest behind.
    BellsUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:3453
    Bells

    --
    04 Mar 2013 01:48 PM
    And +1 kd I missed your comment before I wrote mine
    Take what you like and leave the rest behind.
    judoka64User is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:160
    judoka64

    --
    04 Mar 2013 02:30 PM
    I am a business student and I all hear about is stakeholder satisfaction. I was talking to a professor about this today and thats what he told me what would happen if you recruit more people. I wasn't complaining about having to be nonrate once I get in. I was trying to use this crap I learn about all day along to make a point.

    I don't know crap about this stuff so I am just going to shut up now.
    KDUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:388
    KD

    --
    04 Mar 2013 03:06 PM
    Don't shut up, judoka, this is just getting good

    I have a business degree too, from the 80s (the last time the economy sucked this badly), so I understand your concern about using it! FWIW, if I had to go back, I'd have stuck with communication. It's a lot more fun, and business didn't turn out to be any more marketable for me.

    Since you brought up stakeholders, consider this: contractors have zero stake in the work they undertake, and neither do the people high up in the food chain who contract with them.
    THAT is why there is such poor work quality (cost is a whole 'nother discussion, but we can do that, too, just not at the same time)--neither the contractor nor the person retaining the contract will actually take the icebreaker to sea, live in the moldy, substandard mil contract family housing, eat at the crap galley, shower in the downrange portable with faulty wiring...see where I'm going?

    If you, personally, hire a paint contractor , and he's sloppy or uses the wrong color, you are there to see it, and address the issue or fire him. He has breached his contract--hoping you've gotten to torts in your business law class.
    Government contracts are set up to serve third parties, with little or no recourse....and it doesn't work. On many, many levels.

    And Bells, I think we posted nearly on top of each other a little while ago, looking at the time stamps.
    CGNY2013User is Offline
    New Member
    New Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:81
    CGNY2013

    --
    04 Mar 2013 03:39 PM
    Business 101, have your money work for you, not you work for your money!

    Take all the illegal marijuana the CG seizes and rather than destroying it, sell it to the controllers who market and sell it legally in the 19 States that do so as medical marijuana. Talk about a multi purpose mission! ...
    "You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream." C. S. Lewis
    CaptNickUser is Offline
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:709
    CaptNick

    --
    04 Mar 2013 03:55 PM
    The business model of our nations militaries is terrible. Because we aren't in the business of making "profit", we don't care what our costs are. Simple as that. Thats why we can have $500,000 to spend on fuel, but not have enough money to order 10 gallons of paint. Theres no compromise between funding for operations and funding for maintenance. Theres so much waste its ridiculous.

    The biggest waste of money is MSST units. They waste more money on useless crap than any other unit. But thats an entirely different discussion haha.
    BellsUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:3453
    Bells

    --
    04 Mar 2013 06:59 PM
    We could never sell marijuana, it would be a liability. Just like how we can't give extra food to the homeless shelter sharing a building on my base, it would just be a good reason to sue us.

    And judo, lol you don't have to shutup at all this is a good discussion because people will learn from eachothers opinions. I totaly get your opinion on the A-schools, I live it watching my friends never getting to advance.

    Who knows, this sequester buisness might opt the Commandant to let an early-out program again. And there are always people for whatever reason that might take it. It might open the doors again for advancement. For a lot of people, this is only a 4 year deal despite the economy, or they are made to obligate service so their year 4 year contract suddenly turned into a 6-7 year contract, which probably wasn't their original intention. An early-out program would help those type of people. Would it hurt us a little bit? Ya, we could lose a bunch of skilled workers, but hopefully some chiefs would take the bate too (probably not, but who knows).
    Take what you like and leave the rest behind.
    CGNY2013User is Offline
    New Member
    New Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:81
    CGNY2013

    --
    05 Mar 2013 06:28 AM
    I completely agree Bells and understand the traditional legal point of view. However, we are living in unprecedented times and facing issues and securities we have never faced before. Perhaps it's time for a change in the "old school" ways of thinking and start to adapt. The idea of the CG as a "dealer" is kind of ridiculous. However if you look at it as a business and a science, it would make total sense. OK, forget marijuana, what happens to the gazillions of dollars the CG and the US Customs and Border Patrol seizes from illegal activities? Where does that go? In storage somewhere in lock down? I would just love to see everyones hard work pay off in two fold and help the economy out. It's a little outrageous and definitely out of the box, but desperate times call for desperate measures.

    I think the early out program could be successful. My wife is a teacher of 17 years has to continue to teach for another 17 years to be eligible for retirement at age 55. That would bring her salary at retirement (projected) around $160k/year. We are both up to the idea of her retiring earlier but the penalties outweigh the benefits. Why not let the older teachers go penalty free and heck, maybe even with a little bonus, and allow all the kids now with education degrees with no jobs jump in and start at 1/4 of what the seasoned teachers are making that could retire? Then those teachers that retire would get part-time jobs which in turn would help feed the economy. Same thing here. I digress.......
    "You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream." C. S. Lewis
    jaycatonUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:106
    jaycaton

    --
    05 Mar 2013 07:42 AM
    Generally, after the case is closed the gov't will sell the items and the profit is used to advance law enforcement. Often the agency responsible for the capture gets to keep the funds. At least this is my understanding. As far as the federal gov't adn the coast guard:

    "If a Department of Homeland security branch (TSA, COAST GUARD, CBP, ICE, BORDER PATROL) makes the seizure those assets and funds go to a different "Asset forfeiture" account which is controlled by the Treasury. Those funds are controlled by top level persons with in DHS like Janet Napolitano. Although there are checks and balances for those funds a large portion of those assets are used for federal training facilities for BORDER PATROL, ICE AND CBP."

    source: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_does...drug_money

    So it appears that on some level we are already keeping and using the seized money and other items of value to pay for further advancement of Homeland Security.
    ebeeUser is Offline
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:942
    ebee

    --
    05 Mar 2013 09:58 AM
    Even if it was profitable and practical in every other regard, law enforcement agencies could never sell seized marijuana for the simple fact that it isn't regulated. The money and time they'd spend figuring out if what they seized is up to par to sell for medicinal purposes would likely outweigh any money they'd make off of it.

    As for using contractors, the long term costs are probably where it's cheaper (just like it's often cheaper in the private sector to pay overtime than to hire new staff to fill those hours). You don't have to pay benefits (retirement, health care, unemployment insurance, etc) to contractors. You also don't have to pay to train them. So while sometimes they may seem expensive and a waste of money, they can be much cheaper in the long term. Of course you have to balance that with the level of oversight you have over them, and with the challenges of having "outsiders" doing jobs in an organization which prides itself in camaraderie, brotherhood, etc.
    BellsUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:3453
    Bells

    --
    05 Mar 2013 01:59 PM
    Boom: Contracting example. We have been needing to get our foc'sle redone since ever. And every year because of money issues it is cut out of the contract with Vigor. This year's quote was 200,000 to prep and paint the freaking foc'sle.

    Guess what. We are going to barrow deck growlers from the Polar Star and do it ourselves. Because we don't have any lol. Stuff like that, it's stuff we should be doing in-house, however with only 6 nonrates a few BM3s, it's going to take weeks to a couple months to finish when it would take a crew of 20-30 seaman and bm3s a few weeks.

    Take what you like and leave the rest behind.
    jaycatonUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:106
    jaycaton

    --
    05 Mar 2013 04:32 PM
    Bells, you have mentioned a large swing in the # of nonrates on one boat as compared to another. Any idea why that is?
    CaptNickUser is Offline
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:709
    CaptNick

    --
    05 Mar 2013 05:31 PM
    Posted By jaycaton on 05 Mar 2013 05:32 PM
    Bells, you have mentioned a large swing in the # of nonrates on one boat as compared to another. Any idea why that is?
    Every boat is different. It all depends on that little piece of paper called "The Cutter Organization Manual". Its what states crew compliments of cutters, but gives no reasoning really behind it. We had almost 30 nonrates on my 270, but only 7 on my current 225 (which is "optimally manned").

    If every unit was "optimally manned", there would probably be 5000 less people in the organization. Thats a chunk of $$$ right there...

    BellsUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:3453
    Bells

    --
    05 Mar 2013 10:31 PM
    /\ Yup.

    Also, the crews of the Polar Sea and the Polar Star merged last year, they might still be extras from that. But yes, the smaller white hulls have way more person per square foot than we do.

    Take what you like and leave the rest behind.
    ClaytonRUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:339
    ClaytonR

    --
    12 Mar 2013 02:25 AM
    Posted By Bells on 05 Mar 2013 02:59 PM
    Boom: Contracting example. We have been needing to get our foc'sle redone since ever. And every year because of money issues it is cut out of the contract with Vigor. This year's quote was 200,000 to prep and paint the freaking foc'sle.

    Guess what. We are going to barrow deck growlers from the Polar Star and do it ourselves. Because we don't have any lol. Stuff like that, it's stuff we should be doing in-house, however with only 6 nonrates a few BM3s, it's going to take weeks to a couple months to finish when it would take a crew of 20-30 seaman and bm3s a few weeks.



    I'm getting tired of staring at the brick walls in my jail. Pick me up and I'd be happy to help out.


    ---
    Active Forums 4.3