Putting emergency lights on POV
Last Post 06 Jun 2017 04:02 PM by eirikr1. 18 Replies.
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Kyleb1User is Offline
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Kyleb1

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02 Mar 2014 04:14 PM
    I saw online that a auxillarist had put red and blue lights on his car. Are they allowed to do this?
    Old Guard2User is Offline
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    Old Guard2

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    02 Mar 2014 04:25 PM
    Check your state laws. I know in NJ blue lights are illegal. I believe each state has different regulations. Just don't be that guy. Personally I think it looks ridiculous.
    Sector NY, Staten Island
    Kyleb1User is Offline
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    Kyleb1

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    02 Mar 2014 05:22 PM
    I agree.
    willekgUser is Offline
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    willekg

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    03 Mar 2014 02:21 AM
    In California blue lights are law enforcement only, red are emergency vehicles like fire trucks and ambulances, yellow is allowed for vehicles that may need to block traffic or be near a hazard like private security, tow trucks, pg&e etc. As auxiliary we are not allowed to do anything military or police in action so I don't see the point to the lights.

    Although from my understanding volunteer fire fighters in some places are allowed to have the lights and use them when responding to a fire.
    AmorhetlevenUser is Offline
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    Amorhetleven

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    03 Mar 2014 11:08 AM
    No LE at all for auxiliarists, which means that blue lights are not authorized.
    scoutdad25619User is Offline
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    scoutdad25619

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    04 Mar 2014 07:09 AM
    To piggyback on willekg's post: Yes - in several states volunteer firefighters use blue lights on their POV's to respond to incidents or the firehouse. So if you are a volunteer and your state allows it, use the light for its intended purpose. Nothing more.
    DUTY IS DOING IT, PRIDE IS WEARING IT, TRADITION IS LIVING IT. “DUTY FIRST” – CHIEF EDMUND ENWRIGHT, CHICAGO F.D. (RETIRED)
    NYBoUser is Offline
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    NYBo

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    07 Mar 2014 09:03 PM
    Unless they are authorized for use by any citizen, they wouldn't be legal for an Auxiliarist since we have no emergency or LE authority whatsoever.
    Champman555User is Offline
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    Champman555

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    14 Mar 2014 08:59 PM
    Perhaps it was an auxiliarist that is a Police Officer. I know in my old flotilla we had a few auxiliarist that were also Sheriffs. Where did you see this? Were they on while he was in an auxiliariy uniform?
    AmorhetlevenUser is Offline
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    Amorhetleven

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    16 Mar 2014 03:59 PM
    It doesn't matter if the Auxiliarist is a cop. When you are doing Auxiliary stuff, you have to follow the rules of the Auxiliary set forth in the AUXMAN. This has been an issue with Auxiliarists bringing weapons on bases and underway on their boats.
    scoutdad25619User is Offline
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    scoutdad25619

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    18 Mar 2014 07:40 AM
    Just as a curiosity... What if the Auxiliarist was a volunteer firefighter? Indiana used to require their volunteers to display a blue light that was visible 360-degrees, and most would permanently mount the light. While there tends to be a movement (at least around the Chicago/Northwest Indiana area) to not use the lights, in more rural areas you'll see the blue light more frequently, and as I understand it, Michigan requires volunteer firefighters to use red lights and have a siren (any Michigan folks, feel free to correct me). What would the CG's response be to this? It doesn't effect me either way, but it would be interesting to see how individual state laws for first responders vary, and how Auxiliarists adapt.
    DUTY IS DOING IT, PRIDE IS WEARING IT, TRADITION IS LIVING IT. “DUTY FIRST” – CHIEF EDMUND ENWRIGHT, CHICAGO F.D. (RETIRED)
    Old Guard2User is Offline
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    Old Guard2

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    18 Mar 2014 08:46 AM
    So long as they use it in the commission of responding to a fire, fine. If they turn them on to report to Auxiliary duty... I'll bet there would be hell to pay.
    Sector NY, Staten Island
    CoochUser is Offline
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    Cooch

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    28 Mar 2014 03:09 PM
    Lots of aux's "wearing" things they aren't supposed to these days. Wouldn't be the first time.

    http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?id=9448327

    My favorite is when they go ahead of me in the security line at the airport because they are "military in uniform". I would like to hear one valid reason why an Aux member should be flying commercially in uniform on official business.
    You can meet the standard, or you can set the standard. It's your choice.
    Old Guard2User is Offline
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    Old Guard2

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    28 Mar 2014 04:23 PM
    I had read about that guy, Cooch. What a dispicable disgrace in every possible way! I'm damn proud of my time as a military WIFE but I never forget that's all I was... a WIFE.. not a member. I can't imagine someone assuking the role of something they're not, never were, never gonna be!

    As far as them flying in uniform... so they can bump the line at security and probably in hopes of bumping to First Class at the ticket counter. Again, rather dispicable truly! If they want to use whatever military ID they might be authorized to carry to bump through secuirty a little quicker... so long as they are in jeans. Eh, all the more power to them. I still have a very old, very expired military ID... fi I thought it would get me out of that BS line, I would try sliding it past. But I know that would never fly! So I don't bother. But traveling in uniform, I would walk straight up to thema nd ask them what flotilla and made sure their unit knew about it.
    Sector NY, Staten Island
    scoutdad25619User is Offline
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    scoutdad25619

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    28 Mar 2014 04:38 PM
    Chief, as far as I can tell, there isn't one. There are enough wannabe's out there to make the rest of us look like a**holes and for that I'm sorry. I know you're aware we aren't all like that. And OG, if you find one who tries to play it up, on behalf of all of us who know better, PLEASE have your way with them.
    DUTY IS DOING IT, PRIDE IS WEARING IT, TRADITION IS LIVING IT. “DUTY FIRST” – CHIEF EDMUND ENWRIGHT, CHICAGO F.D. (RETIRED)
    jameslewisUser is Offline
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    jameslewis

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    26 Apr 2014 07:33 AM
    Blue lights may also be called as the blue safety light  .. It means it is used for the emergency and safety purpose.. Mostly in all the states it is illegal to install the blue lights for normal citizens.. The law must be followed by all..
    cicliste666User is Offline
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    cicliste666

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    06 Oct 2016 12:08 PM
    My understanding is that in the rare, rare circumstance an Auxiliarist is called on to assist with an emergency search & rescue, the blue lights are ok in some jurisidictions. For example, they are legal to use for this purpose in NC (NC laws Sec. 20-130.1(9)) provided you have the permission of the local police to use them.
    BellsUser is Offline
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    Bells

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    08 Oct 2016 07:52 AM
    I could say that maybe, auxiliarists have responded to emergency search and rescue, but usually the collaboration required for that unit, meaning, actually getting these people to drop what they are doing and get into their boat,, it just doesn't happen like how you would think it would happen, in most cases. They aren't standing by like how volunteer firefighters do, and the CG has a station or another asset usually available right there. They'll usually be called to supplement a search or salvage, but not be the primary.

    Other people at busier stations might have different experiences.

    In Hawaii we went home and were on a 30 minute recall, and we certainly didn't have lights to put on our cars, and with our traffic we definitely needed them.
    Take what you like and leave the rest behind.
    PotomacAuxUser is Offline
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    PotomacAux

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    28 Oct 2016 01:34 PM
    The Operations Policy Manual could not be clearer on blue lights - not authorized under any circumstances, even if you have active duty shooters aboard an Auxiliary facility doing enforcement work. There does not appear to be any wiggle room for a workaround.

    Red lights is a little less clear but given the blue light policy, it seems like the prudent thing would be to not use red either.

    Amber is allowed under certain circumstances.
    eirikr1User is Offline
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    eirikr1

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    06 Jun 2017 04:02 PM
    >Red lights is a little less clear but given the blue light policy, it seems like the prudent thing would be to not use red either.

    >Amber is allowed under certain circumstances.

    actually it's red and amber that aux are allowed to equip an operational vessel with. I've never seen them used for anything, and cases of such being legitimately used for anything are probably pretty rare.


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