Young people
Last Post 24 Nov 2019 06:13 PM by Still_Waiting. 40 Replies.
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chuck001User is Offline
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chuck001

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10 May 2018 07:29 AM
    I saw a pie chart showing the current age distribution throughout the CG Aux and it's not good.  I'm coming from the angle of the younger generation not stepping up to the plate.  I really admire the older men and women who put their heart and soul in this organization and it saddens me that young folks don't seem to care.  I'm not saying ALL young people but you have to admit, the drive is not there with this generation coming up.  I think I am the youngest member of my Flotilla, being 37 yo, and I'm not sure if there is anyone under 50 or so in the surrounding Flotillas.  It's not just the Aux, but it seems to be a problem everywhere.

    On the flip side of my rant, lol, young folks are not completely to blame for not showing much interest.  Older members will recruit some younger people and then treat them like they are 5 yo.  I see this everywhere especially in the Moose Lodge.  It's like they want the dues and participation from young members but try to control everything since "it's always been this way or that way".

    Do you experience this as well?  Any remedies?

    Do you believe maybe its time to organize and propose some sort of compensation or would that be compromising the integrity of selfless service?
    VicNaz1User is Offline
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    16 May 2018 06:38 AM
    Hi there Chuck,
    You are completely correct. The Aux. is getting older. At 53 and a member since age 41, I am one of the younger ones in my AuxAir unit. The Aux. has seen declining membership in general over the last 20 - 30 years for many reasons but one of the most stark reasons is that the incoming personnel have often been of an older generation that seems more focused on contributing to solutions. One of my members who just retired from the Aux. was an enlisted in the Army during the 50s, used his GI bill to get his degree. Went into the Air Force as an officer, retired as a Major and then ended up joining the Coast Guard Aux. and gave our nation another decade and a half of service, unpaid. It's hard to find that kind of drive and commitment in the general public these days, especiallly among younger people who often seem focused on getting something for free rather than giving something for free.

    For recruiting purposes, look for the kind of people you know already seem to be focused on contributing. You won't necessarily find many folks with 3 sets of uniforms in his closet like my recently retired Aux. member but look for the young men and woman who mentor at school, donate at church, participate in neighborhood clean-up activities. Some of these folks might want to become part of a dedicated, official, make-the-world-better organization like the Coast Guard and if active duty isn't their thing, maybe the Auxiliary is. I usually frame it like being a volunteer fireman. Contribute and save lives. Maybe that will help with out age issue. We need more young superheroes.
    Still_WaitingUser is Offline
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    11 Jun 2018 06:03 AM
    I'm a Millennial in my 30s, so I could probably guess the many reasons why younger people don't want to join the Coast Guard Auxiliary. The most obvious reason is that hardly anyone knows about it.

    Young people do want to volunteer, but they want to feel like they're actually doing something. You have young people volunteering to work with the poor and other disadvantaged people. Doing vessel safety checks and providing boater safety education just isn't as appealing to them.

    I've seen young people come to meetings with interest in the Auxiliary and never come back. The meetings, alone, are enough to turn young people off. And, once they see that most of the members are old enough to be their grandparents, they don't feel like they'll fit in.

    For those under 18, the Civil Air Patrol, Young Marines, and Sea Cadets provide many more opportunities. Once these kids graduate high school, many will join the military.

    For the public safety types (which includes me), they're going to join EMS, police, and fire departments. That IS their way of contributing to society.

    I've been waiting a year just to get AP status in the Coast Guard Auxiliary, and my Civil Air Patrol squadron for adults does nothing. While I'm still young and physically capable, I can do so much more. Therefore, I plan to join a volunteer fire department.

    If a young person lives in a state with an active State Defense Force, I highly recommend that. The Texas State Guard deployed thousands during Hurricane Harvey whereas the Auxiliary only deployed about 100 people. The Civil Air Patrol took damage assessment pictures and transported government personnel. 
    Old Guard2User is Offline
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    15 Jun 2018 02:23 PM
    I am not a millennial, far from it actually. I can tell you why my volunteering is cut to a minimum when at all... I don't feel appreciated. I volunteered for more things in 4 years when I lived in Valdez than most people will in a lifetime, save a few like those mentioned here. I did strong, meaningful work in a small town that appreciated anyone and everyone that stepped up to help. Here, I've looked to volunteer, I have so much more life experience now, and I get told go sit in a corner and stuff envelopes. I get told to sweep the floors of the office (I really did get told that by one organization). I also got told without a degree I don't qualify to volunteer. A DEGREE! To VOLUNTEER! I'm sorry, if I had a degree, I would be interviewing the volunteers, not being a volunteer. I was also told if I speak only English, don't even bother.

    I was the Vice President of the local Food Bank. I did all the shopping, I helped with United Way paperwork. I handed out all the food when we were open. I did all the holiday baskets, buying, creating, delivering... In one instance for a family living on a sailboat in the harbor, all the cooking!

    I was a large contributor to the yearly Salmon Derby. Between Jim & I we arranged all the gifts to be distributed for a 30 day derby.

    I was with the local Health Fair. One of the more rewarding things I did, was a crisis counselor with the local women's shelter. I handled the crisis line when it was my turn, i did intake at the shelter, I went to the hospital with victims, I went to court with victims. I went with the local police department to serve restraining orders. Here? Here I get told well, if you want to come in on a Tuesday afternoon, we can use help getting stuff to the post office. Well I work, so weekday afternoon stuff is a little impossible. Plus that's not getting my hands dirty. That's for someone that wants to say "Oh I volunteer" but keeps their emotions and body out of the trenches.

    To volunteer, you want to feel you make a difference. If all you are tasked to do is meaningless grunt work and feel you're not contributing, why would you stay? I can't do auxiliary because I don't have the money for uniforms and all of that. But again, if the older set makes the younger set feel like "this is how we've always done it, you sit over there and look pretty" what would entice the younger set to contribute? Sometimes it is looking to the organization to get new people... Not the new people looking to the organization to join.
    Sector NY, Staten Island
    eirikr1User is Offline
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    19 Jun 2018 08:55 PM
    Posted By Still_Waiting on 11 Jun 2018 07:03 AM


    >Young people do want to volunteer, but they want to feel like they're actually doing something. 

    >I've been waiting a year just to get AP status in the Coast Guard Auxiliary, and my Civil Air Patrol squadron for adults does nothing. While I'm still young and physically capable, I can do so much more. Therefore, I plan to join a volunteer fire department.

    This is something the aux, as an organization, does a really bad job of. Potential New members are a rare resource, and we act like they grow on trees, and need to prove themselves to us. New members are never as enthusiastic, committed, and high energy as they are in the first 90 days. We give them a book and do the most we can to bore them to tears and calm down. And then throw training for jobs they can't do, and overtraining for jobs they can. 

    > The Texas State Guard deployed thousands during Hurricane Harvey whereas the Auxiliary only deployed about 100 people. The Civil Air Patrol took damage assessment pictures and transported government personnel. 

    Whereas the auxiliary goes out of it's way to announce that we are not a first responder agency. 


    USCG Boat DriverUser is Offline
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    19 Jun 2018 10:19 PM
    It's time to disband the Auxiliary, as it has become a burden and liability for the Coast Guard. Most Auxiliarists are too old to be on boats out in the elements, they aren't medically screened before they start getting on boats, and fail to report medical issues like they are supposed to. This is a huge liability for the CG, as evidenced by the Aux boat crash in Florida a few years ago.

    Auxiliarists also have problems following policies and procedures, often teach the wrong thing to boaters during their boating safety classes, or when conducting vessel safety checks, and frequently embarrass the CG. Most Auxiliarists balk at the standards for maintaining their PPE, and fail to do so.

    Times of changed, young people don't care to be involved with the Auxiliary and the silly games/politics associated with it. It's time to let the Auxiliary go, and reprogram the funding used to support the Aux into the real Coast Guard. We could use it to fix some of our crumbling shore stations.
    Still_WaitingUser is Offline
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    21 Jun 2018 04:00 PM
    Posted By eirikr1 on 19 Jun 2018 09:55 PM 
    Whereas the auxiliary goes out of it's way to announce that we are not a first responder agency. 


    This is what it says on their website. 

    The Auxiliary operates in
    • Safety and Security Patrols
    • Search and Rescue
    • Mass Casualty or Disasters
    • Pollution Response & Patrols
    • Homeland Security
    • Recreational Boating Safety
    • Commercial Fishing and Vessel Exams
    • Platforms for Boarding Parties
    • Recruit for all service in the Coast Guard

    In addition to the above, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary operates in any mission as directed by the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard or Secretary of Homeland Security.

    Our Mission

    • To promote and improve Recreational Boating Safety
    • To provide trained crews and facilities to augment the Coast Guard and enhance safety and security of our ports, waterways, and coastal regions
    • To support Coast Guard operational, administrative, and logistical Requirements
    Our Vice Division Commander, who used to be my flotilla commander, said that they wanted to send more auxiliarists to help with Hurricane Harvey, but there were issues with communication and lack of organization. They plan to have quick response teams ready to go for future disasters. We all know that auxiliarists are not going to be out in the water rescuing people; they will mostly be taking over other Coast Guard duties so that the Coast Guard can send more manpower out into the field. 

    I'm still waiting for AP status. The Coast Guard must be incredibly shorthanded if it takes them over a year to run fingerprints. 
    baloo0136User is Offline
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    22 Jun 2018 08:55 AM
    Posted By USCG Boat Driver on 19 Jun 2018 11:19 PM
    It's time to disband the Auxiliary, as it has become a burden and liability for the Coast Guard. Most Auxiliarists are too old to be on boats out in the elements, they aren't medically screened before they start getting on boats, and fail to report medical issues like they are supposed to. This is a huge liability for the CG, as evidenced by the Aux boat crash in Florida a few years ago.

    Auxiliarists also have problems following policies and procedures, often teach the wrong thing to boaters during their boating safety classes, or when conducting vessel safety checks, and frequently embarrass the CG. Most Auxiliarists balk at the standards for maintaining their PPE, and fail to do so.

    Times of changed, young people don't care to be involved with the Auxiliary and the silly games/politics associated with it. It's time to let the Auxiliary go, and reprogram the funding used to support the Aux into the real Coast Guard. We could use it to fix some of our crumbling shore stations.

    I am sorry that you had such a poor experience with Auxiliarists, and I have met many Auxiliarists who are what you have described above.  However, I have also met many who do not fit the above description and provide valuable support to the Coast Guard.

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    22 Jun 2018 09:16 AM
    Our Vice Division Commander, who used to be my flotilla commander, said that they wanted to send more auxiliarists to help with Hurricane Harvey, but there were issues with communication and lack of organization. They plan to have quick response teams ready to go for future disasters. We all know that auxiliarists are not going to be out in the water rescuing people; they will mostly be taking over other Coast Guard duties so that the Coast Guard can send more manpower out into the field. 

    I'm still waiting for AP status. The Coast Guard must be incredibly shorthanded if it takes them over a year to run fingerprints. 

    For Harvey and Irma, they created a leadership cell at D8 HQ that was used to fill requirements that were sent over from the Area command.  It actually worked pretty once it got going.

    Are you in AP status?  You do know that you can pretty much do anything in the Auxiliary other than Aviation with AP status?
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    22 Jun 2018 10:34 PM
    Posted By baloo0136 on 22 Jun 2018 10:16 AM
    Our Vice Division Commander, who used to be my flotilla commander, said that they wanted to send more auxiliarists to help with Hurricane Harvey, but there were issues with communication and lack of organization. They plan to have quick response teams ready to go for future disasters. We all know that auxiliarists are not going to be out in the water rescuing people; they will mostly be taking over other Coast Guard duties so that the Coast Guard can send more manpower out into the field. 

    I'm still waiting for AP status. The Coast Guard must be incredibly shorthanded if it takes them over a year to run fingerprints. 

    For Harvey and Irma, they created a leadership cell at D8 HQ that was used to fill requirements that were sent over from the Area command.  It actually worked pretty once it got going.

    Are you in AP status?  You do know that you can pretty much do anything in the Auxiliary other than Aviation with AP status?

    I am not in AP status; that's what I'm waiting for. My application, fingerprints, and birth certificate were sent almost a year ago, and that was a couple of months after I started attending meetings. I stopped going to meetings a couple of months ago because I can't do anything. I even had to use vacation time to go to meetings. It's been a total waste of time because I can't do anything. 

    One person in my flotilla said that he waited 18 months for AP status. That is ridiculous. There are people who get security clearances faster than that.
    baloo0136User is Offline
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    23 Jun 2018 11:53 PM
    Uh.... You get AP status by simply submitting your paperwork and having it put into the system. It should take about a week. IQ/BQ status has been taking longer due to the backlog in clearances.

    What flotilla/division/district?

    Still_WaitingUser is Offline
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    24 Jun 2018 02:47 AM
    We were told that we would be in AP status once we received a membership number. Among the people who turned in their paperwork around the same time as I did, we've only gotten confirmation that our stuff was received.

    I'm in Flotilla 7-5, District 8CR.

    The applicant is officially recognized as an Auxiliarist when the DIRAUX accepts the 
    enrollment application by filling out and signing section VIII of the Auxiliary enrollment form 
    (ANSC-7001). The submission of an application is no guarantee of acceptance. The applicant is 
    notified of acceptance or non-acceptance by memo from the DIRAUX. When accepted:
    - the new member is issued an Auxiliary member identification number;
    - the new member’s base enrollment date is established;
    - information is entered in (AUXDATA) where all Auxiliary activity information is 
    recorded;
    - the new member’s PSI package is forwarded to SECCEN for processing;
    - the new member is placed in AP membership status and will remain in that status 
    until SECCEN issues a final suitability-for-service determination;
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    26 Jun 2018 12:05 AM
    I just checked that flotilla.... you guys have AP, IQ, and BQ members that have been processed within the last year. I will private message you on this as it seems a bit odd.
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    21 Aug 2018 08:03 AM
    I agree with the majority of this. I joined my flotilla last year at the age of 39, and until recently I was the youngest member there by far. I was excited when I joined - eager to learn and get involved. But over the past year and a half, I have become discouraged. I've been on patrol once and that was at a joint OPEX last year. I never know when my flotilla is going on patrol. That information is never communicated to us. If I happen to hear about it at a flotilla meeting - awesome. But more often than not, I learn about patrols after the fact. I have been trying to get my five VE training exams so I can become a vessel examiner and that still hasn't happened even though I passed the online exam months ago.

    Flotilla meetings are boring and embarrassing when trying to recruit new members. I became a staff officer because I wanted to contribute and got assigned handling the boat show. I ended up working the majority of shifts with 4 other people volunteering to cover one or two shifts throughout the week. Oftentimes, our booth was entirely empty.

    I would've thought we would do patrol or have an active presence on the lakes this July 4th, but our FC said that we were staying off the lakes that day because it was crazy out there. That makes no sense to me.

    I don't know if it's just my flotilla or if this is widespread, but I do know that my enthusiasm has waned, and I honestly don't want to even be a part of this organization half the time anymore. Maybe if I lived in an area along a coast or major waterway and in an area with an active flotilla, I'd feel differently.
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    31 Aug 2018 07:21 PM
    I am one of the younger members in my Flotilla as well. However, I am blessed to be in an awesome group. We are one of the smaller Flotillas but we have a lot of diversity in the interests of the members. I saw an opportunity to take a program that hadn't had a lot of interest in the past and start building it. It took some time to get the ball rolling with everything but the results have been great.

    After speaking with friends, coworkers and other prospective members, i'm often asked the most about augmentation or ops. That seems to hold the highest interest with the people under 40 whom I speak with about the Auxiliary. Perhaps promoting some of the augmentation and patrol ops through division to newer members would be an enticement for many of them.

    baloo0136User is Offline
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    06 Sep 2018 01:52 PM
    At 42, I see the Auxiliary differently than I did at 29. I was definitely into the augmentation as I worked nights, and I was able to spend 3-4 days a week working with the Marine Safety personnel at the Sector. Now that I work days, I can't get down there really to work, but I was able to finish my Trident during the summers. Now, I am more into the traditional missions of vessel examinations and program visits, and I also do some contingency planning as well.

    Focusing on getting new members qualified and doing some thing that they want to do should be one of the primary goals of the flotilla.
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    06 Sep 2018 08:00 PM
    I just turned 25, and just submitted an inquiry to join a flotilla near my home. I'm hoping to join the CG active duty in the next few years after working out some logistics in my personal life, so this seems like a good way to learn more about boating practices in the meantime.

    I'd also say, on top of young people not knowing about the CG Auxiliary, a lot of people I know in my area have 2nd or 3rd jobs on top of their full time employment in order to pay their bills and crushing student loan debt - it makes it very hard to have any extra time for something like this at all.
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    06 Sep 2018 08:29 PM
    I totally agree with the extra jobs to pay the student loan debt and bills...   I teach all day, coach 2 sports, and then tutor on top of that. 


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    18 Sep 2018 03:54 PM
    I suggest you ask your VFC to do a follow up on your status...I agree that your wait has been far too long. Do you have a membership number. This will give you access to MyAUX. After you get AP there is a lot of things you can do. Please see: http://hdept.cgaux.org/pdf/AP-FAQ.PDF Keep the faith shipmate. Semper Paratus
    Still_WaitingUser is Offline
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    21 Sep 2018 11:49 AM
    I just received a membership number two weeks ago. Apparently, an administrative assistant kept losing the paperwork that was sent in. One applicant from our flotilla had his fingerprints lost four times. Fortunately, our new FC is on top of things and made sure our documents were received. I just had to redo everything. 

    Another good thing about our new FC is that he's young (probably late 20s), and he's partnered with the Civil Air Patrol to get us trained for search and rescue missions. 
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    21 Sep 2018 08:39 PM
    I was interested in joining, I have 9 years of USAF Command and Control experience and interested in helping out in the aviation world. It was suggest to me to contact a chapter that does boating safety on a local lake. That would be in my opinion a complete waste of my time and experience. I never followed up on that suggestion.
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    22 Sep 2018 03:02 PM
    Posted By m1ashooter on 21 Sep 2018 09:39 PM
    I was interested in joining, I have 9 years of USAF Command and Control experience and interested in helping out in the aviation world. It was suggest to me to contact a chapter that does boating safety on a local lake. That would be in my opinion a complete waste of my time and experience. I never followed up on that suggestion.

    Did you look into the Civil Air Patrol? The Air Force provides them with planes.
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    27 Sep 2018 02:03 PM
    I don’t think the auxiliary needs to be disbanded but I think it needs a restart and you brought up some very important comments and observations.

     There are many contributing factors to why the auxiliary is failing and also why young people super enthusiastic at first, but then run as fast as they can to get away.   Here’s what I’ve noticed since been in the aux when I first started in 2006. 

    1.  recruiters like to glorify the auxiliary like it is a first responder volunteer service. They show videos of on water patrols, helo ops, 25 now 27 RBS, air ops ect.  They also talk about being able to serve their country and taking pride in wearing the uniform.  Perspective recruit is invited to attend a monthly flotilla meeting.  The cringe begins! 

    2.  New enthusiastic recruits are exposed to two hours of bickering and yacht club talk about who is going to have white party at who’s house and if somebody is excited to play around with a toy boat “Coastie” 

    3.  Assuming the prospective member is younger they are introduced to elderly men and women who talk about the good old times and then move onto discussing how many times somebody has gone to West Marine to hand out stickers or how many safe boating classes somebody has done in the past year. 

    4.  The prospective member is now confused because everything that they were told originally is not been mentioned.  Prospective member asks about when can they get started on training to serve on water?  They are met with they reply and a chuckle that is not what we do here.  We mainly make sure that people are informed before they get underway out on the water and we like to go to airshows and hand out whistles to the public,  prospective member is confused.

    5.  Everything they’ve been told up until this point in time is not exactly correct and they feel that they have been missed lead.  Prospective member inquires about how they get started because they are thinking maybe they have to be in a while in order to get in good with the organization so they get fingerprinted usually a month later and then the long wait begins. 

    6.  While the member is waiting for their background to come back which usually takes six months to a year maybe the member has been invited to go on a safety patrol Or two.  Since the member is still waiting for their background to come back usually it takes about six months to get their member number so during this time they are not allowed to buy a uniform or participate in activities that may excite the new member. 

    7.  They start to see that there is a heavy dose of politics within the flotilla’s and members example would be that if you have one Coxswain  he will usually pick his buddies to go out on patrol and won’t take any other members.  I found this to be the case many times myself. 

    8.  Six months has gone by and member finally gets there member number so they are able to purchase the tropical blue uniform at the members expense plus all of their gear including PFD, ODUs, float coats ect.  Member usually spends between $1000-$2000.  By this time the member is probably not as enthusiastic as he was when he was sitting down with the auxiliary recruiter so the want to participate is probably now at 65%.  Especially when most of the members time spent at meetings or eating barbecue. 

    9.  If a new member is lucky enough to be in a flotilla within close proximity to a Coast Guard base or station then the member will probably at one time or another ask about how he can work side-by-side with the active duty if he or she has completed the qualifications and training.  The member is most of the time discouraged from these activities.  

    10.  By this time the new member has probably completed the vessel examiners course probably earned a few ribbons and maybe went to a couple of awards ceremony where the same individuals get the same awards every year. 

    11.  The member now understands that there is heavy politics involved in the auxiliary and knows that if you’re not in a favorite group then you will probably be an outcast.  This member by now it’s probably not that enthusiastic but realizes they have spent so much money and time and they don’t want it to be for nothing So they hang in there.  Some continue to only go to meetings once in a great while and some just pay their dues so that they remain on paper active. While some just become driftwood. 

     I lost so many recruits to this type of treatment during my time as personnel services officer.  When I first joined I had to 47 foot vessel’s and I was crew on many other ships.  I would have joined the active duty but I hyperextended my knee is playing sports, MEPS was like ummm no lol. 

     I can remember being out on the water one day in my Sportfisher and watching a auxiliary patrol boat go by so I ran to the Coast Guard recruiting station after I docked and asked about how I could join? At 25 years old  this seemed like an amazing idea and I was fed all of the hype that I stated at the top of the page.  I had law enforcement training/ EMT/SAR ect.  None of my specialties were utilized.  But I became very good at getting a hold of different bakery shops in ordering specialize cakes and I became very good at doing inventory on how many vessel safety check stickers we had and how many whistles we had to give out to the public. 

     I still have faith that the auxiliary could be restored to its wants natural glory. 
     Physically fit, dialed in men and women willing to serve! 

     But like you stated there is a huge liability for you guys and that needs to be taken into account.  I feel that there should be a minimum PT course taken with no exceptions!!! 

     Also weight  and grooming standards need to be observed at all times if you can’t then being in a uniformed organization is probably not the place for you there are plenty of yacht clubs or power squadrons. 

     The problem is that leader ship will not step down and make room for new and able blood.  I understand as an individual gets older they still want to be a part of something they don’t want to lose and identity that was so important to them for such a long time.  I would ask that they should not be kicked out or retired but maybe moved to a administration or social activity office. Because if you are 86 years old  and pulling around an oxygen tank then probably doing vessel inspections or patrols is not the place for you.  And like you said you become a liability. 

     When my grandfather got to a certain age he expressed that he was no longer able to drive with the assurance of safety so he gave it up but he still did a lot of things around his house and other social activities but he said he didn’t want to put the public at risk.  He said I spent my younger years fighting the Nazis in World War II I’ve paid my dues I’ve had lots of fun and a good life I don’t need to prove myself any longer. 

     The problem is not with the auxiliary it is the leadership itself and how things are done the auxiliary as a force multiplier volunteer component of the Coast Guard works well for what it is but it needs to be led by confident and able bodies. 


     I have stated many times that I will no longer try to recruit young new members is all they will be able to do is pass out whistles and sit in a classroom for two hours listening to people bicker about a five dollar charge for donuts! 

     I probably will get a lot of flack for this but I call it like I see it. 


     The motto of the Coast Guard exhilarate is America is volunteer Lifesavers but yet like the poster above stated they go out of their way to really emphasize that they are not first responders! 

     I almost feel like if there was a patrol underway and they witnessed somebody drowning in the water and if there was a 25-year-old auxiliary still on board who was maybe a water polo athlete he would be ordered not to jump in and save that individual,  not because the other is on board don’t think he could do it but because they are probably jealous at the fact that he could and they could not. 


    The auxiliary was something that meant so much to me and I had so much love for it especially when I was able to work alongside the active duty because I always made sure that I never got in the way and I actually became good friends with a lot of the younger active duty men and women who were my age.  At the time I was 25 and now I’m 35.  Still young, still able, still patriotic but told to stand down and shut up. 

     Something needs to change! 

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    29 Sep 2018 10:36 AM
    Unless the height and weight and physical fitness standards are very loose, implementing them will likely lead to fewer recruits. Most police and fire departments don't even have height and weight standards. Almost all of them require a physical fitness test for applicants. Many of them are implementing annual physical fitness tests. Height and weight ratios aren't really indicative of physical fitness. There are many people who would be considered overweight by the military, but can run 1.5 miles in less than 15 minutes, which is good enough for most police departments. On the other hand, the Texas State Guard started enforcing its height and weight regulations about two years ago, but they have no physical fitness test. This means that they're recruiting a lot of slim-looking people who aren't actually physically fit. When I took law enforcement physical fitness tests, there were a lot of slim applicants who failed because they couldn't drag a 180 lb. dummy.

    If someone can meet military height and weight and physical fitness standards and wants to be in a military organization, then they should just join as active duty, reserve, or the national guard. You can't expect too much out of volunteers who are not paid and are expected to spend hundreds of dollars on uniforms. Many auxiliarists probably wanted to join the military, but couldn't due to a medical disqualification. Those medical disqualifications could make it impossible for them to pass a military physical fitness test. My prediction is that, if the Auxiliary implemented height and weight and physical fitness standards, potential recruits would just become volunteer firefighters and reserve police officers. In my state, they actually get some valuable benefits such as free college courses at public colleges and universities. The Coast Guard Auxiliary gets nothing but small discounts at a small number of businesses.

    Depending on the state, state defense forces offer so much more. California State Military reservists can have up to 100% of their tuition paid at public colleges and universities. Texas State Guard veterans receive veterans' preference for state jobs. Mississippi State Guard members qualify for free or low-cost law enforcement, EMT, and firefighter training. In many states, SDF members get paid whenever they are deployed. Coast Guard Auxiliary members receive nothing. My state won't even protect the jobs of auxiliarists or CAP members who are assisting during natural disasters, but Texas State Guard members do have their jobs protected. Employers in Texas are required to give Texas State Guard members leave for military service. 

    In short, I don't think it's a good idea to ask so much of people who are expected to pay hundreds to thousands of dollars out of pocket when they will never receive wages or benefits. If people have to meet high physical standards, then they will be much better off becoming reserve police officers or deputies, volunteer firefighters, or members of a state defense force.
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    01 Oct 2018 07:37 AM
    I almost feel like if there was a patrol underway and they witnessed somebody drowning in the water and if there was a 25-year-old auxiliary still on board who was maybe a water polo athlete he would be ordered not to jump in and save that individual, not because the other is on board don’t think he could do it but because they are probably jealous at the fact that he could and they could not.


    It has nothing to do with jealousy. Auxiliarists, under orders, are specifically prohibited from entering the water for any reason. Should an Auxie violate that rule and enter the water, they automatically revert to civilian status and fall outside the USCG liability umbrella. They might also jeopardize the liability umbrella of the boat they were serving on. There is a reason that Aux boats are supposed to have spare life jackets and boats hooks on them.

    OpsPolMan 4.E.19. Entering the Water

    Auxiliarists on an Auxiliary facility that is under orders shall not enter the water during any operations. This restriction also applies to PWC coxswains, except when necessary to mount or dismount to allow normal operation, remount if involuntary ejected, or while performing PWC coxswain qualification task “dismount/remount/re-right in deep water” under the supervision of a mentor in accordance with Auxiliary Boat Crew Qualification Guide, Volume III, COMDTINST M16794.54 (series).


    The next section also prohibits operation in the surf zone. That was put in many moons ago when an Aux boat went into the surf zone on a rescue, overturned and several Auxies died after being trapped in the overturned boat.
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    18 Jun 2019 11:46 AM
    There have been Auxiliarists who've entered water and came out the other side with an MOM - I recall seeing a whole video on one at AUXLAM.

    I'm a millennial, the problem with young people in the Aux are:

    1. No one knows about it.

    2. Lack of time/money to commit to these activities. Either you're working 2-3 jobs to maintain a decent standard of living or if you're lucky enough to have a decent job, it is hard to volunteer during your 20s-40s when you have kids and a family. This ties into 3.

    3. Boats are expensive and millennials (who are in their late 20s-late 30s at this point) as well as zoomers have way less money.

    4. If they are young and in-shape, they will just join the military.

    5.. Some of the older folks have...different attitudes towards things. I've heard some negative things from younger, female members about creepy old dudes and had to reprimand one on the spot for something they did to a member of my flotilla.

    Otherwise there are plenty of younger folks that I've seen join - they just seem to fade out when they have a family.
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    22 Jun 2019 06:21 AM
    Posted By Tohickoner on 18 Jun 2019 12:46 PM
    There have been Auxiliarists who've entered water and came out the other side with an MOM - I recall seeing a whole video on one at AUXLAM.

    I'm a millennial, the problem with young people in the Aux are:

    1. No one knows about it.

    2. Lack of time/money to commit to these activities. Either you're working 2-3 jobs to maintain a decent standard of living or if you're lucky enough to have a decent job, it is hard to volunteer during your 20s-40s when you have kids and a family. This ties into 3.

    3. Boats are expensive and millennials (who are in their late 20s-late 30s at this point) as well as zoomers have way less money.

    4. If they are young and in-shape, they will just join the military.

    5.. Some of the older folks have...different attitudes towards things. I've heard some negative things from younger, female members about creepy old dudes and had to reprimand one on the spot for something they did to a member of my flotilla.

    Otherwise there are plenty of younger folks that I've seen join - they just seem to fade out when they have a family.

    None of this is new.  I joined the Aux almost 20 years ago when I was in my early 30's and everything you list here was true back then as well.  I was the youngest person in my flotilla for quite a long time, but I stuck with it and I'm glad I did.  I didn't let the fact that most everyone else was at least 30 years older deter me.  I then was able to recruit a few younger people and most of them are still in Aux.  If you want younger people to join, you have to do some work yourself to raise awareness about what we do and recruit them.  I have seen more younger people joining lately, but a lot of those are in their 20's and want to join the Coast Guard.

    I agree the Aux is an expensive organization to join and it can be a barrier for some, but there are ways to limit your expenses.  For example, you don't have to buy ALL the uniforms.  If you only buy the ODU and the trops, that will work for just about every activity you'll be involved in.  In all these years, I've never bought the SDB.  And what you said in #3 is a bit misleading.  You don't need to own a boat to be in the Aux.

    A lot of the activities you can be involved with vary by location, but if you're near a Coast Guard station, you may be able to get involved in some pretty interesting stuff.  I also like the leadership classes and the opportunities to hold leadership positions, which have helped me in my career outside the Aux.  






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    22 Jun 2019 01:48 PM
    I joined the Aux at 25. With school and a full time job it was hard to volunteer. I mostly joined to fill the time until I enlisted in active duty coast guard. Now that I'm active I struggle even more to find time to give to the auxiliary. I did manage to recruit a couple younger people to my flotilla. The auxiliary needs to promote itself more like the civil air patrol does.
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    26 Jun 2019 02:00 PM
    Our flotilla recently gained 7 new members via the AUP (Auxiliary University Program) Unit we established at a local college. Something to look into.
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    16 Jul 2019 07:08 PM

    The Coast Guard must be incredibly shorthanded if it takes them over a year to run fingerprints.


    The Aux is at the bottom of the list when it comes to security processing, Active Duty, Reservists and civilian employees all jump to the head of the line, regardless of how long an Aux may have been in the line.
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    16 Jul 2019 07:20 PM
    There have been Auxiliarists who've entered water and came out the other side with an MOM - I recall seeing a whole video on one at AUXLAM.
    I believe I saw the same video at an Annual Ops Workshop. The video was very old and the instructor could not explain how the actions depicted met the requirement to never enter the water. Also remember an quote I heard from a Coastie - "The line between being a hero or a goat is a very fine one." You might, just might get away with something if you are successful - fail and the world will come down on your head - assuming you survive your transgression.
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    18 Aug 2019 04:42 PM
    I'm simply astonished at the comments here. If your flotilla isn't operating up to snuff, fix it. It's your flotilla, it's not anyone else's responsibility.

    The age issue isn't an AUX problem. It is affecting everyone from Amateur Radio to the Masons, I don't understand it, I've been working as a volunteer in some capacity since joining the police cadets at 16, and my kids have the same kind of spirit.

    Our relationship with the station is amazing. They are always happy to see an AUX arrive, whether we're there to take watchstanding, AUXFS, gate guard, or work with the MSD group. Our 45-50 active members make a perceptible and appreciated difference in the operation of the station.

    If your flotilla doesn't, it's likely a problem you can fix.
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    11 Sep 2019 09:20 AM
    I agree that the age issue is affecting everyone. We've seen volunteer fire departments in my state dwindle with the lack of volunteers. The pool of persons who have that sense of service is getting smaller and smaller.

    We are also competing with other organizations for these volunteers. What do we have to offer versus CAP, Volunteer Fire, local Search and Rescue...

    The recent recruitment videos have created some interest. Can we capitalize on that?

    We need to all be part of the recruiting process. When a prospective member comes to a flotilla meeting we need to wear our uniforms correctly, we need to put a good attitude forward, we need to be a good face for the Auxiliary.
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    11 Sep 2019 12:08 PM
    Srtmack I think another part of volunteer fire departments is no one works where they live. My father was a volunteer fire fighter and first aider. It was because he worked close enough that when the alarms went off, he could make a call. Now even if I had the ability to volunteer, I live in Easton, Pennsylvania. I work in Bridgewater, New Jersey. If they waited for me to respond from work to home, it is over 35 miles one direction. The house would burn, the patient would die. I leave my house before 630 in the morning and some nights I don't get home until after 7. Life isn't what it was when my dad volunteered in the 1960's. I'm old and my life is slow in comparison to the activity level of young people today. I know there are some that are just selfish and won't volunteer. But a lot more, I truly I think, just comes down to people pulled in so many directions, so much distance, they just can't take on another commitment to something. It is just the world we live in.
    Sector NY, Staten Island
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    15 Sep 2019 07:40 PM
    Posted By srtmack on 11 Sep 2019 10:20 AM
    I agree that the age issue is affecting everyone. We've seen volunteer fire departments in my state dwindle with the lack of volunteers. The pool of persons who have that sense of service is getting smaller and smaller.

    We are also competing with other organizations for these volunteers. What do we have to offer versus CAP, Volunteer Fire, local Search and Rescue...

    The recent recruitment videos have created some interest. Can we capitalize on that?

    We need to all be part of the recruiting process. When a prospective member comes to a flotilla meeting we need to wear our uniforms correctly, we need to put a good attitude forward, we need to be a good face for the Auxiliary.

    I tried joining a volunteer fire department and gave up. There is the issue someone else mentioned --- location. Volunteer fire departments are typically in unincorporated areas out in the suburbs and rural areas. Even if you're willing to make the drive, some departments require you to either live in the service area or within one mile outside of it. There are some departments that require an EMT certification; I came across departments that required volunteers to go through a full-time fire academy. I applied to a department that said it was offering a stipend to certain volunteers to attract more people. At the same time, they had a competitive selection process. I wasn't selected because I neither had EMT nor firefighting experience. They didn't care that I had law enforcement and public safety dispatching experience. I wasted time and money getting a physical, driving down there to drop off the application, and driving there again for an interview. Some of these departments are asking too much for volunteer positions.
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    07 Nov 2019 08:12 AM
    @Still_Waiting

    I'm a part-time Fire Fighter cross staffing an Engine and a Rescue and my day job is supporting law and fire. The pay is terrible, the commitment is high. Past shifts, we have details, and training. We run 24hr shifts so it works for me as I live 45 miles north of the station. I realize the process is frustrating but even the small agencies are required to follow state and NFPA standards. If you lack the training and certs you have to obtain them some how. Some agencies will sponsor and more often than not, you have to shell out cash. Opportunities such as the USCG Aux and a slew of others are out there. You will have to decide for yourself what is the right fit for you.

    Regarding the age, I did notice that during Flotilla meetings. A very small percentage are in their late 30s and early 40s. It shouldn't stop you from what you want to do and many of them have served before you so it's a great learning experience. Hope you find what you're looking for.
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    18 Nov 2019 12:42 PM
    Honestly, a lot of young people are struggling to hold a job, not to mention college and lack of interest in hard work. I feel those are a few factors that keep the younger generation from joining- cost and work. That being said, when you think of getting into the Aux your looking at needing at least 1 set of trops and 1 set of ODU to get anything done. Personally, it might not be a bad idea to revamp and offer more. As I see it, the Aux does have a lot to offer and a great opportunity to serve and support. Here some ideas to encourage both recruitment and retention.

    1) Rank- Think of this similar to CAP. While it does not give us authority over anyone, especially the coast guard, it is something to work towards. To advance would require time in grade, advancement in a specific track as well as specialized training (think history, custom and courtesies, etc). I feel this gives pride but would also push people to move up in office. For example- new members would have to complete all new member training (MADTR and BQ) and have six months as a new member before the ability to move into Ensign (O1). As an O1 they can begin working on a specialty track (such as PA, HR, etc). Upon a year as an ensign you could then petition to move into O1 (LT Jr) which would allow you to run for VC, however, you would have to be promoted into O3 (Lt) with a year as O2 in order to run for FC. And so forth. Essentially you would have to meet the requirements for advancement in grade in order to run for that equivalent office and meet any special training.

    Some of the ideas to advance would be:

    O1 Ensign- six months as a member with 75% attendance. Must complete all mandatory and BQ requirements and attend at least 1 public event as well. After advancing into the O2 grade they may then serve in an FSO position.

    O2 Lieutenant Jr- Six months as ensign and completion of online training in an FSO position (example, completion of the LMS training for PA). Must have at least six months in an FSO position to advance.

    O3 Lieutenant- 1 year in previous grade and completion of custom and courtesies. Must also be able to show knowledge of general coast guard rank recognition. Must have also completed the LMS PA program.

    O4 Lieutenant Commander- 2 years as an O3 and completion of leadership C-School (which cost would be covered by Aux). In addition, should also have at least 40 hours logged in public affairs over the last two years as well (which includes social media, pa events, etc) in addition to at least 10 hours hours in public education.

    And so on and so on. This is just an example, however, in order to move up you would put in the effort and feel more rewarded. Not that we use a lot of custom and courtesies in the flotilla (think saluting, etc) but building on the same skills as the active duty as we advance would allow us to feel a lot closer to the CG as well as the pride that comes with it.

    2) Cost... I realize we have to all buy our own uniforms, and not taking away from that it would be great if new members at least received the polo shirt (DHS from Aux Cen, that one!)... It would be a way for us to get new members into the program with a uniform to start. They would still need grey pants and shoes, however, this would ONLY be issued after they achieve two elemets: BQ status and advancement into the grade of Ensign/FSO position. This allows members to have some kind of uniform to start while building up the rest of a complete set (be it trops or ODU).

    3) Rank- you keep seeing me mention it and there is a reason. Being a Coast Guard Aux it would be great if we used it more, recognized it more, etc. Its a sign of pride. From the way we approach leadership, so those in specific staff positions, to etiquette and even history of those we serve. This does not mean we have authority as the gold sign would, but would be along the side of the silver only. It also shows our commitment to the coast guard with the continual and on going education we would be pursuing in order to advance.

    4) Discounts for members- I know we have some, but unless you own a boat, a lot does no good for members (think the flares, boatus, etc). Some additional benefits could include networking with local gyms for member discounts (think 5.00/month vs 10.00/month for planet fitness, or maybe 25% off fore YMCA) as a way to encourage health, fitness and mission readiness. Maybe network with auto shops in order to promote discounts on basics such as tire rotation, oil change and tune ups, in addition to hotels, rentals and vacation packages. I know corporate businesses who offer these, so maybe the Aux could as well.

    5) Petition to train- simply put, an opportunity to petition into coast guard training based on need and interest. Obviously need would be placed over personal interest, however, would still offer an opportunity to train, even if the training may not be something we can do directly as an aux member. We represent the coast guard as an aux in multiple areas, including recruiting and the academy. A good example would be petition to train in EMT, Firefighter or even rescue swimmer. Based on availability and needs, those who are accepted would still need to meet the exact requirements as active duty in that training.

    For example of need, a member petitions to train at a coast guard school teaching EMT basic. Upon completion of training this member would be an additional asset because they can serve the Aux on patrol, or augment as a medical assistant at active duty stations or underway. They would still have to meet the height and weight requirements, as well as have the required gear for attending the course, which would be done right along side active duty shipmates.

    An example of interest would be coast guard firefighter training. While we may not be able to augment and serve as a firefighter, this training could still be good to talk about for CG opportunities for recruiting, as well as a personal growth. This would be based HIGHLY on seats available during the class and the ability to meet all active duty requirements. This could, however, also serve for flotilla's to talk about fire safety underway so it could still serve a local purpose by building knowledge for promoting education. 

    6) Lastly, ability to attend CG events such as balls, memorials, etc. Being able to attend these as Aux members I think would also establish networking and continual interest. Imagine attending an event five states away and networking with a cutter captain who invites you out. What an opportunity to learn, grow and get more involved.

    The idea above is to encourage personal growth and create a relationship other than showing up and just doing the basics. It also offers something people can use in real life on a resume outside of "just volunteer service". You gaining knowledge, skill, leadership and a network of people with a common goal.

    As mention, these are just some ideas to encourage recruitment, retention and also personal growth within the auxiliary.

    My experience for this basis includes:
    Member of the CG Aux
    Former Civil Air Patrol
    Former US Army (11B)
    State cert as a Firefighter I
    Training in Search and Rescue (Ground)
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    19 Nov 2019 06:53 AM
    Mclarke, I completely agree with your ideas. I pitched pretty much the same ideas to my Flotilla. The Auxiliary should model itself more like the Civil Air Patrol and create a rank system. The current system of holding an office doesn't really promote working towards moving upwards in the Aux.

    I've also noticed that depending on where the Flotilla is based out of makes a difference in how active they are. Flotillas near major Active Duty Coast Guard units participate a lot in training activities and have a presence around the base.

    I would love to see the Auxiliary gain a little more recognition with the public and the Active Duty Side. I do my best to promote the Auxiliary while I'm on Active Duty
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    20 Nov 2019 08:27 AM
    I'm speaking as a new guy in AP status. I have a really hard time observing the relationship between Active Duty, Reserves, AUX, and Civilian employees because I'm still at the Flotilla level. I'm sure this will improve over time as I continue training, obtaining qual, and getting involved. However, I can't seem to get a straight answer regarding the dynamics of the relationships between each group and if AUX presence is warranted and or respected. I understand everyone's experience and personality differs but I'm looking for an overall opinion before I fully invest my time and efforts.
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    24 Nov 2019 05:48 PM
    Posted By flatfour on 07 Nov 2019 09:12 AM
    @Still_Waiting

    I'm a part-time Fire Fighter cross staffing an Engine and a Rescue and my day job is supporting law and fire. The pay is terrible, the commitment is high. Past shifts, we have details, and training. We run 24hr shifts so it works for me as I live 45 miles north of the station. I realize the process is frustrating but even the small agencies are required to follow state and NFPA standards. If you lack the training and certs you have to obtain them some how. Some agencies will sponsor and more often than not, you have to shell out cash. Opportunities such as the USCG Aux and a slew of others are out there. You will have to decide for yourself what is the right fit for you.

    Regarding the age, I did notice that during Flotilla meetings. A very small percentage are in their late 30s and early 40s. It shouldn't stop you from what you want to do and many of them have served before you so it's a great learning experience. Hope you find what you're looking for.

    I wouldn't have applied to a position I didn't qualify for. No experience or certification was required. The agency provided SFFMA training, which is the certification program many volunteer fire departments use in Texas. When I turned in my application, the human resources person said that my public safety experience would make me look better. Apparently, they were looking for someone who had hung around firefighters and EMTs. They even asked me in the interview if I had any family members who were firefighters and/or EMTs. It was a stupid question, in my opinion, especially considering that I had worked in law enforcement and related jobs for many years. Why care if I'm related to firefighters? 

    As for the Flotilla I joined, once younger leadership took over, more training opportunities were provided. Some of the younger members (under the age of 50) served in the military while some of the older members were wannabe military. The older members were content with only doing vessel safety checks and marching in parades. Now that I've moved, I have little interest in joining the local flotillas because it appears all of their members are over the age of 60, and there's no ethnic diversity. I was fortunate that my last flotilla became diverse in age and ethnicity in the past year.


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    24 Nov 2019 06:13 PM
    Posted By mclarke86 on 18 Nov 2019 01:42 PM
    Honestly, a lot of young people are struggling to hold a job, not to mention college and lack of interest in hard work. I feel those are a few factors that keep the younger generation from joining- cost and work. That being said, when you think of getting into the Aux your looking at needing at least 1 set of trops and 1 set of ODU to get anything done. Personally, it might not be a bad idea to revamp and offer more. As I see it, the Aux does have a lot to offer and a great opportunity to serve and support. Here some ideas to encourage both recruitment and retention.

    1) Rank- Think of this similar to CAP. While it does not give us authority over anyone, especially the coast guard, it is something to work towards. To advance would require time in grade, advancement in a specific track as well as specialized training (think history, custom and courtesies, etc). I feel this gives pride but would also push people to move up in office. For example- new members would have to complete all new member training (MADTR and BQ) and have six months as a new member before the ability to move into Ensign (O1). As an O1 they can begin working on a specialty track (such as PA, HR, etc). Upon a year as an ensign you could then petition to move into O1 (LT Jr) which would allow you to run for VC, however, you would have to be promoted into O3 (Lt) with a year as O2 in order to run for FC. And so forth. Essentially you would have to meet the requirements for advancement in grade in order to run for that equivalent office and meet any special training.

    Some of the ideas to advance would be:

    O1 Ensign- six months as a member with 75% attendance. Must complete all mandatory and BQ requirements and attend at least 1 public event as well. After advancing into the O2 grade they may then serve in an FSO position.

    O2 Lieutenant Jr- Six months as ensign and completion of online training in an FSO position (example, completion of the LMS training for PA). Must have at least six months in an FSO position to advance.

    O3 Lieutenant- 1 year in previous grade and completion of custom and courtesies. Must also be able to show knowledge of general coast guard rank recognition. Must have also completed the LMS PA program.

    O4 Lieutenant Commander- 2 years as an O3 and completion of leadership C-School (which cost would be covered by Aux). In addition, should also have at least 40 hours logged in public affairs over the last two years as well (which includes social media, pa events, etc) in addition to at least 10 hours hours in public education.

    And so on and so on. This is just an example, however, in order to move up you would put in the effort and feel more rewarded. Not that we use a lot of custom and courtesies in the flotilla (think saluting, etc) but building on the same skills as the active duty as we advance would allow us to feel a lot closer to the CG as well as the pride that comes with it.

    2) Cost... I realize we have to all buy our own uniforms, and not taking away from that it would be great if new members at least received the polo shirt (DHS from Aux Cen, that one!)... It would be a way for us to get new members into the program with a uniform to start. They would still need grey pants and shoes, however, this would ONLY be issued after they achieve two elemets: BQ status and advancement into the grade of Ensign/FSO position. This allows members to have some kind of uniform to start while building up the rest of a complete set (be it trops or ODU).

    3) Rank- you keep seeing me mention it and there is a reason. Being a Coast Guard Aux it would be great if we used it more, recognized it more, etc. Its a sign of pride. From the way we approach leadership, so those in specific staff positions, to etiquette and even history of those we serve. This does not mean we have authority as the gold sign would, but would be along the side of the silver only. It also shows our commitment to the coast guard with the continual and on going education we would be pursuing in order to advance.

    4) Discounts for members- I know we have some, but unless you own a boat, a lot does no good for members (think the flares, boatus, etc). Some additional benefits could include networking with local gyms for member discounts (think 5.00/month vs 10.00/month for planet fitness, or maybe 25% off fore YMCA) as a way to encourage health, fitness and mission readiness. Maybe network with auto shops in order to promote discounts on basics such as tire rotation, oil change and tune ups, in addition to hotels, rentals and vacation packages. I know corporate businesses who offer these, so maybe the Aux could as well.

    5) Petition to train- simply put, an opportunity to petition into coast guard training based on need and interest. Obviously need would be placed over personal interest, however, would still offer an opportunity to train, even if the training may not be something we can do directly as an aux member. We represent the coast guard as an aux in multiple areas, including recruiting and the academy. A good example would be petition to train in EMT, Firefighter or even rescue swimmer. Based on availability and needs, those who are accepted would still need to meet the exact requirements as active duty in that training.

    For example of need, a member petitions to train at a coast guard school teaching EMT basic. Upon completion of training this member would be an additional asset because they can serve the Aux on patrol, or augment as a medical assistant at active duty stations or underway. They would still have to meet the height and weight requirements, as well as have the required gear for attending the course, which would be done right along side active duty shipmates.

    An example of interest would be coast guard firefighter training. While we may not be able to augment and serve as a firefighter, this training could still be good to talk about for CG opportunities for recruiting, as well as a personal growth. This would be based HIGHLY on seats available during the class and the ability to meet all active duty requirements. This could, however, also serve for flotilla's to talk about fire safety underway so it could still serve a local purpose by building knowledge for promoting education. 

    6) Lastly, ability to attend CG events such as balls, memorials, etc. Being able to attend these as Aux members I think would also establish networking and continual interest. Imagine attending an event five states away and networking with a cutter captain who invites you out. What an opportunity to learn, grow and get more involved.

    The idea above is to encourage personal growth and create a relationship other than showing up and just doing the basics. It also offers something people can use in real life on a resume outside of "just volunteer service". You gaining knowledge, skill, leadership and a network of people with a common goal.

    As mention, these are just some ideas to encourage recruitment, retention and also personal growth within the auxiliary.

    My experience for this basis includes:
    Member of the CG Aux
    Former Civil Air Patrol
    Former US Army (11B)
    State cert as a Firefighter I
    Training in Search and Rescue (Ground)

    I'm currently in the Civil Air Patrol. While creating a rank system might help a little, CAP currently has issues with encouraging senior members to advance. Many are happy staying at 2nd or 1st lieutenant. I think there's also an issue with providing the required training and mentoring to advance. A couple of my former fellow flotilla members tried to join CAP, and they stopped showing up because there was no guidance on training. 

    I think both organizations have issues with when and where training is provided. You want me to drive over three hours away to attend training on a weekday and stay there for a couple of days or more? Young people have to work. 



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