How does getting paid work?
Last Post 21 Dec 2009 10:33 PM by bosco11. 3 Replies.
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Potato2User is Offline
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Potato2

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12 Dec 2009 01:57 PM
    I'm going to be going into the reserves and I was wondering how getting paid by the drill works. What does that even mean: "drill"? I know that you do 4 drills each weekend you're at your station, but do you get paid bi-weekly or after the weekend you do your drills or what?


    In love I was created and in love I hope to die

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    US_CG_PSUser is Offline
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    US_CG_PS

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    14 Dec 2009 02:57 PM
    The CG pays on the 1st and 15th of every month.  Depending on where your drill falls in the month, you will be paid on one of these 2 days.


    jchen012User is Offline
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    jchen012

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    18 Dec 2009 07:52 AM
    You do 4 drills a month, not 4 drills each weekend. It is only one weekend, not every weekend. A drill is 4 hours long. When you go into the Reserve, you are assigned a weekend, for example I am assigned to the 1st weekend of every month. Therefore I will get paid on the 15th. Hope that makes sense.


    bosco11User is Offline
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    bosco11

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    21 Dec 2009 10:33 PM
    Typically, a reservist drills one weekend each month. A drill is a minimum of four hours and if a person works a four hour period Saturday morning and another on Saturday afternoon, he or she has earned two drills. One may not earn more than two drills per day. Thus, one who works Saturday and Sunday(full days) earns four drills. The operative word is typically. Depending on the unit, many reservists drill during the week. It's a function of the type of command, its mission, its manpower needs, and its training program. While enlisted personnel may be required on occasion to work more than eight hours a day, it is not unusual for officers to put in many, many more hours. The notion that an officer goes to drill, works two days a month, and that's it, is pure fantasy...that is, if you expect to succeed. In fact, reserve officers, those who aspire to be promoted and recognized as top performers, and therefore remain in a pay billet, can expect to work many hours during the month to keep up with the considerable paperwork requirements expected from them. For years, my drill hours were 0730 until....until the work is done.....and that could be and often was late in the day. I often left the unit on Sunday night at 1900, 2000, or later to begin the two hour drive home. Drill weekends, for most officers, is little more than a time to determine which paperwork projects require work and/or completion during the month. An OER(performance evaluation) can take many, many hours of work...and that's just an appraisal of performance...unit projects still await completion. Active duty commanding officers are generally unsympathetic to the fact that reserve officers usually have demanding civilian occupations. To him, the active duty commanding officer, he just wants the job done properly prior to its deadline. And there's no compensation for the additional hours. Theoretically, that's why officers earn more money....and if you do the job expected of you...you earn every penny.<!-- Edit -->

    Last Edited : 12/24/2009 9:25:06 AM GMT



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