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Switch to Air station
Last Post 03 Aug 2015 08:46 AM by Joey B. 12 Replies.
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dmeltUser is Offline
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dmelt

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07 Jul 2015 01:30 AM
    Hypothetical situation, there's an opening at an air station in my district, I'm a non rate that wants to put my name on AMT a school list. Is it possible to switch units? Would it be better if I was unqualified? Or qualified? Thanks
    mkellyUser is Offline
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    mkelly

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    07 Jul 2015 09:27 AM
    Is it a hypothetical or an actual situation? I think the answer is the same either way. Yes it is possible but your command has to be okay with it and they are going to need somebody to fill your spot once you leave.
    Being qualified or not being qualified just depends on your command if its better or not. Sometimes being qualified will come back to bite you because you are more valuable to the unit that way and they won't want to let you leave. If you're not qualified though, they may look at you like somebody who isn't working hard to help them out and may not want to give you to another unit or do any favors for you. Either way, you should work hard to get qualified.
    If your command won't let you go completely, you can ask if you can go for a month or so to check things out. That is a more likely situation. Pick a time that is typical slower at your unit and try to go to the air station for at least a week or so. What is the hypothetical air station?
    BellsUser is Offline
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    Bells

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    07 Jul 2015 10:03 PM
    I think it would definitely be beneficial to at least go TDY, a transfer might not be possible since they don't have airman programs anymore at random airstations. However a TDY, especially local, and no cost orders, would be possible.

    At my last unit, a nonrate was on the amt list for a couple years and went tdy to an airsta, and found she didn't want to be an amt anymore. It wasn't what she thought it was going to be. She instead struck MK, and since then has transferred.
    Take what you like and leave the rest behind.
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    08 Jul 2015 05:28 PM
    My opinion is that if you are going to spend the rest of your career at airstations, enjoy the experience at a different kind of unit as a non-rate.
    ejhcougarUser is Offline
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    ejhcougar

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    08 Jul 2015 08:43 PM
    Something else to consider is that non-rates at air stations don't work on the hangar deck. They paint, mow lawns, etc. They aren't any more an "aviator" than a non rate on a cutter. In fact, on a cutter you can get tie down qualified, and deal with the helo more than a non rate at a station. The only counter to ebee's statement, because they are right, is that its still better to spend every day at an airsta vs a boat...but thats just the wings talking.
    Eoghan RoeUser is Offline
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    Eoghan Roe

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    09 Jul 2015 11:39 AM
    I'd agree with Bells. I think maybe TDY is your better choice. Most non-rates I've talked to from air stations didn't do much more than yard work.

    At least TDY they would know you're there for more of a purpose and at least sit you down with an AMT for a bit to discuss that possible future.
    ejhcougarUser is Offline
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    ejhcougar

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    10 Jul 2015 08:49 PM
    Sorry, forgot to add that TDY is the way to go. If you come TDY you will basically work with the AMT shop for whatever airframe the air station has. For us, you split your time between the H60 and the HC144 platforms. Depending on the air station you might actually get to work on the plane. Plus they usually will try to get you on a flight so you can see if you can handle it. Some people spend all this time to get the Aviation ratings and then find out they get air sick the way we fly and they have to leave or switch ratings. If you have any questions about aviation let me know! Also, what area are you in? If you are in D1 its pretty easy to get non rates over TDY.
    BellsUser is Offline
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    Bells

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    11 Jul 2015 01:40 AM
    I did not know airsick was a thing that's very interesting.... Is it like being boatsick lol?
    Take what you like and leave the rest behind.
    ejhcougarUser is Offline
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    ejhcougar

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    11 Jul 2015 10:23 AM
    Bells,

    It's similar except a normal flight is 3 hrs versus the misery of a 60 day patrol with seasickness. I've never been more miserable than my first four days across the gulf of Alaska...

    But yes, people get air sick frequently. Some people only get sick in certain air frames. Me personally, if I can stay cool I'm fine regardless of how rough the flight is. But obviously flying in the spring on an 80-90 degree day with a dry suit and two base layers it's hard to stay cool...even with the door open.
    mkellyUser is Offline
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    mkelly

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    11 Jul 2015 10:24 AM
    I've never seen airsick either yet. I knew it was a thing though. I've seen sea sick when we took some YN on a rescue swimmer flight and used them as survivors. It was about an 8ft swell and that made them sick when they got in the water. I've also seen a lot of new boaties leaning over the side of the boat losing their lunch when we are doing helo ops with them.
    One time when we were doing some night training and I was spinning a lot on the hook, then I got inside the helo after the 4th evolution and started changing out of my gear, I felt queasy when the pilot made a hard banking turn and I wasn't looking outside. That got better though once I started looking out.
    BellsUser is Offline
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    Bells

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    11 Jul 2015 11:22 AM
    Lol! Ya boaties get seasick all the time. The worst is 1 helo ops lol because we're at that 30-40 degree angle, and 2 heavy weather, mostly because it just sucks.
    Take what you like and leave the rest behind.
    ejhcougarUser is Offline
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    ejhcougar

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    11 Jul 2015 12:15 PM
    It all depends on the flight profile. The Hu-25 falcon got a LOT of people sick. They had to practice 45 degree angle of bank turns and such and you are sitting sideways staring at a computer. For the 60's it all depends on the mission and the weather. If the weather is nice and you aren't doing auto rotations its not bad. When you do 15 or 20 autos where you literally are falling out of the sky it wears on you. The big one that got people here was AUF missions and training. Trying to fly and position for a shot with a boat trying to stay underneath you all while looking at a screen facing a different direction is killer! We had one flight where we would do a 360 around the nose, then a 360 around the tail, all while moving down the runway sideways and going from 25 ft to 10 ft and back up and down. So we spun in circles, sliding right, climbing and descending. That was rough...
    Joey BUser is Offline
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    Joey B

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    03 Aug 2015 08:46 AM
    If you can survive one of those 'rides' at an amusement park, you should be able to handle flying. Although flying lasts a bit longer than a minute and thirty seconds . . . . hopefully.

    Joe - helos 2000 hrs +
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