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Rate With Highest Chance Of Getting Shore Unit
Last Post 27 Jun 2018 02:11 AM by Old Guard2. 22 Replies.
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Daniel1120User is Offline
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Daniel1120

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15 Jun 2018 03:50 PM
    In other words which rate has a high chance of getting a billet for a shore unit and very LOW chances of getting assigned to a cutter? Don’t include a PA or MST rating because of the extremely long wait time. I was thinking yeoman? I figured since they do mostly admin stuff they’d be assigned to work in sectors even though I know some do go on cutters. Can anybody tell me more about this and other rates that are very likely to not be assigned to a cutter? I really don’t wanna be on a cutter longer than I have to now, I know the whole “choose your rate choose your fate” thing but I don’t think I’m gonna make a career out of the military and if I end up do then I will be trying for OCS or even look into CSPI.
    stealthtt24User is Offline
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    stealthtt24

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    15 Jun 2018 05:07 PM
    The best way is to not join a sea going service. SK or YN.
    m1ashooterUser is Offline
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    m1ashooter

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    15 Jun 2018 11:53 PM
    Just curious as you know the USCG goes to sea and serves on small boats thats what most of them do in one way or another. Whats got you interested in becoming a member of the USCG if you want to do min sea time. Even officers go underway.
    Daniel1120User is Offline
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    Daniel1120

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    16 Jun 2018 09:10 AM
    Well when I talked to my recruiter about everything he made it sound like cutters went underway for at most 2 months a year once a year. Then during boot camp I learned they are usually import for 2 months then underway for 2 months and it really turned me off from wanting to be on a cutter and making a career in the Coast Guard.
    jdhuskerUser is Offline
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    jdhusker

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    16 Jun 2018 09:58 AM
    Expect to be underway for a total of 6 months every year if you are on a cutter plus duty days while inport. But if being on a cutter discourages you from joining the Coast Guard then please consider a different branch. Cutters are the main operation force of the Coast Guard.
    phxcoastieUser is Offline
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    phxcoastie

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    16 Jun 2018 09:59 AM
    To echo other responses to this thread, we are a sea going service. And as a military service, we must be willing and able to accept worldwide deployment. That being said, cutter life isn't for everyone. Still, even aviation rates get underway (but aren't permanently assigned to) on cutters. Rates such as IS, ME, aviation, HS typically see a higher shoreside ratio of billets. But, say an ME at a DSF unit, will typically see some sort of deployment on a cutter, navy, or allied warship.

    Don't turn down opportunity just because you don't 'want' to get underway. I've known many a coastie who went a rate they didn't really want just to fast track their time as a non-rate. Many regretted it, and some even took a reduction in rank and slowed down their career progression to later attend an 'A' school that they really wanted in the first place. Enjoy your time, with more rank comes more responsibility. Good luck!

    Daniel1120User is Offline
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    Daniel1120

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    16 Jun 2018 11:25 AM
    Just to reiterate this: I am already in the Coast Guard. I graduated boot camp and am on a cutter that deploys for 2 months the at a time. I already know I’m gonna be gone 6 months a year. I don’t really care about being in a rate I’m not interested in because I absolutely HATE being on a cutter and going underway. I WILL NOT be re-enlisting after 4 years and I WILL NOT mind being in a rate I find boring as long as I’m not going underway and can come home most nights.
    stealthtt24User is Offline
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    stealthtt24

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    16 Jun 2018 12:37 PM
    Then def SK or YN in your position, especially with a shorter wait time for school. Any of the other shore side units have longer wait times; aviation, HS, MST, etc. BM, GM, CS, and the technical rates EM, ET do get underway a decent amount. Go the admin route, much less chance.
    Daniel1120User is Offline
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    Daniel1120

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    16 Jun 2018 01:08 PM
    Okay thank you so much!
    m1ashooterUser is Offline
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    m1ashooter

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    16 Jun 2018 10:45 PM
    From this post and your quals post it would appear you have some concerns and issues. Maybe you should explore a discharge.
    mkellyUser is Offline
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    mkelly

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    17 Jun 2018 07:08 AM
    Any aviation rating has 100% chance of being stationed on shore and I would say a pretty good chance of you actually enjoying the rest of your time in the Coast Guard. With any "A" School, you are going to have to extend your contract and most likely stay in a little longer.
    If you have been mistreated on the cutter, then it is important to bring that up to a supervisor you can trust and seek other options.
    If you just don't enjoy your work and life on the cutter, then I think its important to stick out your enlistment and move on when its up. While you are in, see if you can take advantage of some of the benefits available to active duty such as tuition assistance. Next time you are in port, see if your command will send you TDY to an air station or shore unit so you can spend some time with different ratings and see what you may like to do. It will give you a little break and also show you what life is like in the CG outside of the boat.
    Best of luck!
    jdhuskerUser is Offline
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    jdhusker

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    17 Jun 2018 07:57 AM
    I hated being on a cutter when I first got there too but it has grown on me and while i wouldn't choose to be on a cutter i wouldn't mind doing it again. And your other post says you reported less than a week ago, you can't possibly know if you will like it yet.
    sevenup87User is Offline
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    sevenup87

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    17 Jun 2018 01:26 PM
    Daniel1120. I'm sorry to hear that you have been soured to cutter's so quickly. Your plight is a common one though. Having just finished a 3 year tour onboard a cutter I will speak to your from experience.

    Almost no one actually enjoys being underway (I certainly didn't). The demands are heavy, you will experience sea sickness, as a non-rate you will do some of the dirtiest jobs in the CG, and you will be away from shore and those you love.

    But the attitude you take can make these experiences worth while, or you can make them self destructive.

    A positive attitude will allow you to make life long friends, achieve high marks ( which will get you to A-school), create an atmosphere where people WANT to help you, create a sense of pride in your work that you can take with you for the rest of your life, and foster an atmosphere where you leave the ship better than you found it.

    A negative attitude will be immediately spotted by your shipmates and command, it will lead to poor relationships onboard, which will lead to poor marks (which could cause a CO to withhold recommendation for advancement), and you will create more unnecessary suffering for yourself and those around you.

    I personally took the attitude of "fake it till you make it." Every time I had the 4-8 watches I made sure I had a smile on my face when I relieved, and made sure I said good morning to everyone. I left my ship with my CO offering letters of recommendation, and the respect of a crew that knew I did my absolute best to be a positive force onboard.

    I hope that can help you during your currents assignment. STAY STRONG!

    As for A-School to get to shore... I would say IT or IS. But if being underway bothers you that much I don't think the CG is for you (it isn't for everyone, nothing wrong with that). But remember everything about the CG revolves around being U/W and supporting those U/W.
    joseywalezUser is Offline
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    joseywalez

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    18 Jun 2018 01:34 PM
    Please ensure your ONLY reason going Yeoman is not that you just don't want to get underway. This is what causes Yeoman to have a bad name. Members who just don't want to get underway so they have a negative outlook on the CG which in turn reflects on their customer service. I'm not saying you will be one of those people, but really think hard on your decision of going a customer service rate. Being a Yeoman is great, especially when you put in the work and customer service. It can really make or break your career, and it is a plus when the MCPOCG knows you by name and reputation (in a positive way of course). Best of luck shipmate!
    Old Guard2User is Offline
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    Old Guard2

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    19 Jun 2018 08:03 AM
    sevenup87 - I say bullshit on your most don't even like being underway. My son enjoyed it as a nonrate and he enjoyed it as 3rd & 2nd class. He is at a shore unit now and would probably sell his left nut to get back shipboard. Sadly he will likely not see many more tours afloat. That kills him. He has sea water in his veins and would rather be on a cutter than any land unit.

    joseywalez - I second your sentiment. If you want to go yeoman just to avoid seatime and figure eh, it is easy, I push a few papers and then I go home... You're going to suck and you're going to piss off shipmates that need yeoman that are willing to work with an attention to detail. There is no easy route. I think Daniel is looking for the easy button, there isn't one.

    Daniel - I don't believe for a minute your recruiter said cutters only go out for 2 months out of the ENTIRE CALENDAR YEAR. What the hell do you think they did the other 10 months? Barbecue on the fantail? They just looked pretty sitting a pier? Also, weren't you on this forum before you shipped??? Please, you should have done a little research and not been so ridiculously naive.
    Sector NY, Staten Island
    Old Guard2User is Offline
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    Old Guard2

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    19 Jun 2018 08:06 AM
    OH! MY! GOD! You've been on your cutter less than TWO FREAKING WEEKS and it is in drydock and you already know you hate cutter life? Oh please. Grow the hell up, do the job you signed up for and quit your bitching. You are the reason nonrates are called the FNG's.
    Sector NY, Staten Island
    stealthtt24User is Offline
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    19 Jun 2018 12:49 PM
    If go OCS, which would surprise me since you whine like crazy, they get underway too.
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    24 Jun 2018 10:55 PM
    I don’t think I’m gonna make a career out of the military and if I end up do then I will be trying for OCS or even look into CSPI.


    If you are having any sort of hard time now or don't 'like' being on the Cutter, then I promise, PROMISE you that you'll have a rough time in OCS. I went thru OCS as an E6 , and it was extraordinarily difficult, despite having overcome several hurdles throughout my career and feeling that I was ten feet tall and bulletproof. Think boot camp on steroids, and twice as long. Obviously plenty of folks make it thru, however they WANT to be there more than anything, and put their heart and soul into their performance to get there. Then, once out of OCS, the real challenge of succeeding as an officer begins. It's important to know that you're not guaranteed a full career as an officer. Promotions are not automatic, you'll have to work hard to continue moving upwards.

    All that being said, I am sure that you CAN SUCCEED in any of these programs with the right mind-set, hardwork, and proven dedication to duty, but it takes time and isn't an entitlement, it's earned. That will be totally up to you. When I was a non-rate I was also quite jaded about my job. I planned on going to 'A' School and finishing out the required extension on my enlistment. As time went on I found meaning in what I was doing, and it changed my perspective. I grew up.

    I hope you find your calling, but don't be dead weight on your cutter. Step up and do your job with your head held high. We don't need people in the service who drag their feet about doing their duty. If you are going to get out, then make your time count. The Coast Guard believed in you enough to offer you an enlistment, prove them right on their investment.
    CPORJMUser is Offline
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    CPORJM

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    24 Jun 2018 11:14 PM
    How's that going to work when you're a new ensign and your first assignment is on a cutter. I don't think you know what you want
    "When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him."-Jonathan Swift
    Old Guard2User is Offline
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    25 Jun 2018 09:06 AM
    Posted By phxcoastie on 24 Jun 2018 10:55 PM


    If you are having any sort of hard time now or don't 'like' being on the Cutter, then I promise, PROMISE you that you'll have a rough time in OCS. I went thru OCS as an E6 , and it was extraordinarily difficult, despite having overcome several hurdles throughout my career and feeling that I was ten feet tall and bulletproof. 
    I remember when my ex went to OCS.  Same thing, he was an E6 at the time, held down an MSD (those don't even exist anymore) all by himself when there was no LT assigned there.  Successfully set up an incident command post all alone when the Exxon Valdez ran aground.  Had a lot of responsibilities a normal E6 at a full MSO would never have received.  He thought oh please, OCS, it'll be hard but I got this.  I remember his first off base liberty, week 5, oh how he wanted to quit!  He missed me, our son, it was, like you said, boot camp on steroids.  He was so miserable, unhappy, couldn't understand why he had to work THAT HARD again.  I told him, stick it out, I would be back in 2 weeks for another liberty weekend.  If he still hated it, he could drop then, go back to E6, make Chief, find another path.  It didn't get easier but the momentum changed, they weeded out the majority of the weak by week 5.  He said it wouldn't be so bad after all and made it through just fine after that.  But you are so right... It is not easy, regardless of the experiences you have, it will be difficult, it will break you down all over again and build you back up.

    Congrats on your successes!

    Sector NY, Staten Island
    CPORJMUser is Offline
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    CPORJM

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    25 Jun 2018 09:26 PM
    Posted By Old Guard2 on 25 Jun 2018 09:06 AM
    Posted By phxcoastie on 24 Jun 2018 10:55 PM


    If you are having any sort of hard time now or don't 'like' being on the Cutter, then I promise, PROMISE you that you'll have a rough time in OCS. I went thru OCS as an E6 , and it was extraordinarily difficult, despite having overcome several hurdles throughout my career and feeling that I was ten feet tall and bulletproof. 
    I remember when my ex went to OCS.  Same thing, he was an E6 at the time, held down an MSD (those don't even exist anymore) all by himself when there was no LT assigned there.  Successfully set up an incident command post all alone when the Exxon Valdez ran aground.  Had a lot of responsibilities a normal E6 at a full MSO would never have received.  He thought oh please, OCS, it'll be hard but I got this.  I remember his first off base liberty, week 5, oh how he wanted to quit!  He missed me, our son, it was, like you said, boot camp on steroids.  He was so miserable, unhappy, couldn't understand why he had to work THAT HARD again.  I told him, stick it out, I would be back in 2 weeks for another liberty weekend.  If he still hated it, he could drop then, go back to E6, make Chief, find another path.  It didn't get easier but the momentum changed, they weeded out the majority of the weak by week 5.  He said it wouldn't be so bad after all and made it through just fine after that.  But you are so right... It is not easy, regardless of the experiences you have, it will be difficult, it will break you down all over again and build you back up.

    Congrats on your successes!

    OG2-You sure?  Last time I checked MSD Santa Barbara was still alive and well.

    "When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him."-Jonathan Swift
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    joseywalez

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    26 Jun 2018 12:48 PM
    MSD's are alive and well, she may mean Loran Stations. There was one in Alaska and it was very secluded with few personnel.
    Old Guard2User is Offline
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    Old Guard2

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    27 Jun 2018 02:11 AM
    I thought they all changed to sectors and other names. Maybe it is just MSO's that don't really exist in name anymore?? Never at a LORANSTA. My ex was an MST & an M officer his entire career.
    Sector NY, Staten Island
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