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DC-DAMAGE CONTROLMAN
Last Post 24 Nov 2015 11:42 AM by Ulysses. 21 Replies.
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chuklesUser is Offline
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chukles

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09 Jan 2010 01:52 AM
    DAMAGE CONTROLMAN (DC)


    To view a video of this rate, click here.

    DCs assigned to cutters are responsible for watertight integrity, emergency equipment associated with firefighting and flooding, plumbing repairs, welding fabrication and repairs, and chemical, biological and nuclear-warfare detection, and decontamination.

    Types of Duty:

    DCs are stationed throughout the Coast Guard, including Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Guam. Afloat assignments for DCs include all major cutters, buoy tenders, and river tenders. Aboard cutters, DCs are assigned to the engineering department where they qualify to stand engineering watches. Shoreside assignments for DCs include Integrated Support Commands (ISCs), Air Stations, Groups, LORAN Stations, Marine Safety Offices, Tactical Law Enforcement Units, and Small Boat Stations.

    Training Available:

    Training to become a Damage Controlman can be accomplished by on-the-job training or by attending Damage Controlman 'A' School in Yorktown, VA. In the 13 weeks of DC 'A' School, students will have classroom instruction and lab time in each of the following areas: welding; oxy-fuel gas cutting; firefighting; carpentry; plumbing; watertight closure maintenance; chemical, biological, and radiological warfare defense; and shipboard damage control. Advanced training in welding, firefighting, and shipboard damage control procedures are available for DCs assigned to cutters.

    Qualifications:

    To be a DC, you should have an interest in performing construction, repairs, and responding to emergencies. Practical experience or prior training in welding, carpentry, plumbing, and firefighting is helpful, but not required.

    Related Civilian Jobs:

    Welder
    Plumber
    Carpenter
    Pipe Fitter
    Ship fitter
    Firefighter
    Home Inspector
    Building Inspector
    Trade School Teacher
    Construction Foreman
    Maintenance Supervisor


    Vr,
    Chuck

    These poor, plain men, dwellers upon the lonely sands of Hatteras, took their lives in their hands, and, at the most imminent risk crossed the most tumultuous sea…and all for what? That others might live to see home and friends. — Annual Report of the U.S. Life- Saving Service, 1885

    Recruiting Website

    Read here for answers to the most often asked questions about joining the Coast Guard!

    I, for one, welcome our new insect overlords. I'd like to remind them that as a trusted Coastie, I can be helpful in rounding up others to toil in their underground sugar caves.
    chuklesUser is Offline
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    chukles

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    09 Jan 2010 01:53 AM
    posted from old forum.

    Anyone wish to share their knowledge about Damage Controlmen? I ask because I can't remember one single post regarding this rating. If I was not considering a career with the CG I'd probably pick this or FS as a rating because they'd benefit my personal life. DIY network's newest host: Bored of Desk Jobs! ha.
    It all begins February 16th 2010!






    Gears
    The cake is a lie...




    Date Joined Nov 2009
    Total Posts : 145 Posted 1/2/2010 9:42 PM (GMT -5)
    Your basic DC is a welder, carpenter, fire fighter, and pipe fitter. They are the subject matter experts on shipboard damage control and firefighting.

    If you want a more glamorous description, if the Roman Empire had DCs it would have been built in a day. DCs work with EMs and MKs to keep ships afloat and steaming. It's definitely a great rate with plenty of training that correlates to the civilian sector. See also MK and EM.
    "When you fall on your face you are still moving forward."




    chukles
    Recruiter




    Date Joined Nov 2008
    Total Posts : 1170 Posted 1/3/2010 10:13 AM (GMT -5)
    DCs assigned to cutters are responsible for watertight integrity, emergency equipment associated with firefighting and flooding, plumbing repairs, welding fabrication and repairs, and chemical, biological and nuclear-warfare detection, and decontamination.

    Types of Duty:

    DCs are stationed throughout the Coast Guard, including Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Guam. Afloat assignments for DCs include all major cutters, buoy tenders, and river tenders. Aboard cutters, DCs are assigned to the engineering department where they qualify to stand engineering watches. Shoreside assignments for DCs include Integrated Support Commands (ISCs), Air Stations, Groups, LORAN Stations, Marine Safety Offices, Tactical Law Enforcement Units, and Small Boat Stations.

    Training Available:

    Training to become a Damage Controlman can be accomplished by on-the-job training or by attending Damage Controlman 'A' School in Yorktown, VA. In the 13 weeks of DC 'A' School, students will have classroom instruction and lab time in each of the following areas: welding; oxy-fuel gas cutting; firefighting; carpentry; plumbing; watertight closure maintenance; chemical, biological, and radiological warfare defense; and shipboard damage control. Advanced training in welding, firefighting, and shipboard damage control procedures are available for DCs assigned to cutters.

    Qualifications:

    To be a DC, you should have an interest in performing construction, repairs, and responding to emergencies. Practical experience or prior training in welding, carpentry, plumbing, and firefighting is helpful, but not required.

    Related Civilian Jobs:

    Welder
    Plumber
    Carpenter
    Pipe Fitter
    Ship fitter
    Firefighter
    Home Inspector
    Building Inspector
    Trade School Teacher
    Construction Foreman
    Maintenance Supervisor
    Vr,
    Chuck

    These poor, plain men, dwellers upon the lonely sands of Hatteras, took their lives in their hands, and, at the most imminent risk crossed the most tumultuous sea…and all for what? That others might live to see home and friends. — Annual Report of the U.S. Life- Saving Service, 1885

    Recruiting Website

    Read here for answers to the most often asked questions about joining the Coast Guard!




    ezekiel97
    if its broken..paint it!




    Date Joined Jan 2009
    Total Posts : 497 Posted 1/3/2010 1:36 PM (GMT -5)
    be ready to do plumbing and play with some poop. A DC from a wmec came over to talk to one of our nonrates about it, and said thats a fair part of the job. When you get into fleet and have to do seops, if you enjoy it/comes fairly easy dc would probably be a good fit, seops was challenging and very hard for me.
    Stationed in Key Wes, FL
    Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends. -John 15:13




    Gears
    The cake is a lie...




    Date Joined Nov 2009
    Total Posts : 145 Posted 1/3/2010 6:06 PM (GMT -5)
    SEOPS and Basic/Advanced DC PQS are meant to be challenging. But, the knowledge and experience you gain is essential to ship board life.

    I've known quite a few DCs. They do more than "play with some poop." A good DC can take a pile of chaos cut it, weld it, put it on a lathe, and make it into a spice rack that can withstand hurricane force winds. It's a great rate if you are looking for some serious challenge.
    "When you fall on your face you are still moving forward."




    wepprop
    Yet Another Coastie Dad




    Date Joined Nov 2007
    Total Posts : 3188 Posted 1/3/2010 6:08 PM (GMT -5)
    Besides, everyone who's ever bought a house ends up playing with, er, pipes...


    Vr,
    Chuck

    These poor, plain men, dwellers upon the lonely sands of Hatteras, took their lives in their hands, and, at the most imminent risk crossed the most tumultuous sea…and all for what? That others might live to see home and friends. — Annual Report of the U.S. Life- Saving Service, 1885

    Recruiting Website

    Read here for answers to the most often asked questions about joining the Coast Guard!

    I, for one, welcome our new insect overlords. I'd like to remind them that as a trusted Coastie, I can be helpful in rounding up others to toil in their underground sugar caves.
    MNiemczyk24User is Offline
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    MNiemczyk24

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    25 Jan 2011 05:34 PM
    Evening All. I just recently came across some discouraging news after attending MEPS today. It appears I'm color deficient. That basically shot my dream of any aviation rate out the window. Now my options are extremely limited, and the only two I'm considering are DC and MST. My question is, what are the 'C' Schools and/or qualifications that a DC can acquire? Is it possible to get into Law Enforcement while being a DC?
    pepperdoggieUser is Offline
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    pepperdoggie

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    01 Feb 2011 01:46 PM
    I know it's very possible to get a considerable amount of training in the MST rating. The Rating name is a little misleading. MST's do a great deal of ship boardings/inspections. My son fills an MST billett (he's a BM), and he has gone to many LE schools. The VBST units (vessell boarding security teams) all receive extensive training in law enforcement, maritime law, environmental law, as well as advanced weapons and tactics training. He has trained with the FBI, Secret Service, Customs and Border Protection and NYPD.

    Hope that helps

    Here's a taste of what the VBST does:

    http://www.coastguardd5publicaffair...51/273067/
    creesheeUser is Offline
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    creeshee

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    19 Feb 2011 06:47 PM
    I dont know what to trust more, the A-school waiting list posted by the Coast Guard, or my recruiter.

    My recruiter told me the wait for DC would be about 6 months, but the wait list has an estimate of more than 24 months. There are only about 50 some people on the list, which is short compared to others, but I dont know how quickly they get put through the school.

    Any advice?
    chuklesUser is Offline
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    chukles

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    19 Feb 2011 07:08 PM
    Your recruiter is incorrect. Current A school list dated 15 February 2011 states;

    DC-A: More than 24 months 06JUN11

    Only 1 school is listed. There may be more coming down the pike, but do not have access to my emails until Tuesday.
    I, for one, welcome our new insect overlords. I'd like to remind them that as a trusted Coastie, I can be helpful in rounding up others to toil in their underground sugar caves.
    cgashleyUser is Offline
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    cgashley

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    19 Mar 2011 09:59 PM
    The description on gocoastguard.com has me interested (really, I'm interested in all the rates, with the exception of maybe two lol)... any insider info on day to day life? Just doin my hw!
    pjdimon1992User is Offline
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    pjdimon1992

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    20 Oct 2011 04:19 PM
    I am really interested in DC school due to the fact that while i was attending community college i was majoring in Fire technology. I noticed this was the only rate with fire fighting listed under civilian related jobs. If there is and DC's out there who could help me out. I am looking to be a fire fighter when i get out so and help would be much appreciated. thanks
    gdeyarmondUser is Offline
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    gdeyarmond

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    20 Oct 2011 05:40 PM
    I was really looking into DC and then found a guy at my station had been striking DC when he was on the KUKUI and said that the nick name "turd chaser" is very true. On a cutter, he was clearing plumbing constantly....he did a little welding and did even less fire fighting. I will say that the DC's do run any fire stations the USCG has and they also do a lot of construction projects etc. It's up to you, but just giving some insight on a pretty small rating.
    pjdimon1992User is Offline
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    pjdimon1992

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    21 Oct 2011 10:46 AM
    Thanks gdeyarmond. I am still looking at all the ratings to see what i really want to do. do you know what C schools there are for DC?
    Old Guard2User is Offline
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    Old Guard2

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    21 Oct 2011 12:02 PM
    Here is information on the A school and C schools available to a DC.

    http://www.uscg.mil/tcyorktown/TEW/dc.asp
    Sector NY, Staten Island
    Jlambert1224User is Offline
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    Jlambert1224

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    06 Jan 2013 09:33 AM
    Are there DCs on icebreaking tugs?
    GearsUser is Offline
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    Gears

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    31 Jan 2013 03:50 PM
    The Bristol Bay and Mobile Bay have DCs on them, plus they're attached to barges.
    “I’m not in this world to live up to your expectations and you’re not in this world to live up to mine.” ― Bruce Lee
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    jesse24b

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    10 May 2013 09:36 PM
    Any color deficient DCs on here? If so, can you answer some questions for me.
    scoutdad25619User is Offline
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    scoutdad25619

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    11 May 2013 06:05 AM
    Just because I'm curious... The bases that have dedicated firefighters - are they civilian contractors or are they members? If they are members, are they DC's?
    DUTY IS DOING IT, PRIDE IS WEARING IT, TRADITION IS LIVING IT. “DUTY FIRST” – CHIEF EDMUND ENWRIGHT, CHICAGO F.D. (RETIRED)
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    aztecmatt

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    16 Oct 2014 01:41 PM
    Looks like it's all crickets over here in the DC thread. For any of you that have worked alongside or known DCs, how would you describe their day-to-day job/life and if they enjoyed it?
    JDMDUser is Offline
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    JDMD

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    16 Oct 2014 02:19 PM
    I've worked with DCs on cutters and on land, here's my take...

    On cutters, they will maintain all DC equipment (fire, flooding...), they will do plumbing jobs, any welding or wood work as required. You will also be expected to run the show in as an on scene leader, locker leader ect. during drills and actual emergencies. Ive also seen DCs be EOWs, boat crewmen, buoy deck supervisors and all sorts of random things. It's really going to be biased on the unit's needs.

    As for ashore, many DC spots are facility/ housing maintainance. It seems like a pretty relaxed job except for during transfer season. During that time they run around like they've lost their heads.

    As for how much they enjoy it, I think it depends on the person. There are people who like to have a normalish 9-5 job and would like an ashore unit in housing or something. But there is also people who like to get underway, and more likely than not be working a much more demanding schedule and a sense of urgency.
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    AztecMatt41

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    22 Oct 2014 12:50 PM
    Posted By JDMD on 16 Oct 2014 03:19 PM
    I've worked with DCs on cutters and on land, here's my take...

    On cutters, they will maintain all DC equipment (fire, flooding...), they will do plumbing jobs, any welding or wood work as required. You will also be expected to run the show in as an on scene leader, locker leader ect. during drills and actual emergencies. Ive also seen DCs be EOWs, boat crewmen, buoy deck supervisors and all sorts of random things. It's really going to be biased on the unit's needs.

    As for ashore, many DC spots are facility/ housing maintainance. It seems like a pretty relaxed job except for during transfer season. During that time they run around like they've lost their heads.

    As for how much they enjoy it, I think it depends on the person. There are people who like to have a normalish 9-5 job and would like an ashore unit in housing or something. But there is also people who like to get underway, and more likely than not be working a much more demanding schedule and a sense of urgency.

    Thanks for the detailed response, I didn't know DCs did housing maintenance.
    UlyssesUser is Offline
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    Ulysses

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    23 Nov 2015 12:55 AM
    As far as cutters, which types are DC billets on? I know they are on high and medium endurance cutters, but what about the black hull fleet? What's the smallest cutter there is a billet on? I know DC is an underway billet and I would likely be on a high endurance cutter at least once, but some of the smaller cutters, especially a black hull, have missions I am more interested in.
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    JDMD

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    23 Nov 2015 10:29 AM
    There were DCs on the river buoy tender I was on and the 175' buoy tender. They are surely on a 225' I'd bet too. If you are currently in the CG, go into CGBI's e-pal thing. Inside there, you can look at all the spots DCs are at.
    GearsUser is Offline
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    Gears

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    23 Nov 2015 07:58 PM
    The 225s have several DCs, the 154s have one. Hope that helps.
    “I’m not in this world to live up to your expectations and you’re not in this world to live up to mine.” ― Bruce Lee
    UlyssesUser is Offline
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    Ulysses

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    24 Nov 2015 11:42 AM
    Extremely helpful thank you both.
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