Register | Login
United States Coast Guard Forums and Information
The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion
AET-AVIONICS ELECTRICAL TECHNICIAN
Last Post 19 May 2017 11:55 AM by Strix. 88 Replies.
Printer Friendly
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Sort:
PrevPrev NextNext
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Page 3 of 3 << < 123
Author Messages
ejhcougarUser is Offline
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Send Private Message
Posts:562
ejhcougar

--
12 Mar 2014 05:31 PM
mkelly you have some things wrong. The first thing you will do at an airsta is going to be getting Basic Aircrewman qualified. This is different for each airframe. It is much easier to get qualified on fixed wing vs the helicopters. Then, you will basically be line crew and maintenance, along with training flights for a couple of years (depending on the unit) and THEN you will go into the flight mechanic syllabus. Bigger units take longer to get to the FM stage, it also takes longer on the Jayhawks than a 65. If you were to get a unit such as Clearwater, Kodiak, or Cape Cod, you will be lucky to leave your first tour as a qualified Flight Mech. Smaller places are quick. As for the day to day job, you are an ET and EM rolled in to one. It takes a long time to figure out the flow of working on the hangar deck because it is a lot different than the boat world. For the 60's specifically, you will be buried in that plane every day doing maintenance as well as flying occasionally. Basic Aircrewman is a practical factor to make E-5 for AET.

I am an AET on 60's and I am also in the pipeline for the AUF program so I have a lot of different experience within aviation. If you have any questions PM me and I can answer them.
ericdykemaUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:68
ericdykema

--
14 Mar 2014 05:00 PM
Thanks to both of you for the great insight! I got to talk to some AETs at the Air Station here in San Diego and they said the same things as well. They said that your flight mech qual is all about how much effort you put into it, but that if there is a huge line of others that are already qualified at your unit, that you might not get fully qualified just because of the unit size as already stated.

The new list for March 2014 came out today and the numbers are looking good so far. I'm putting my name on AET at the end of March and if the pace keeps up I"m hoping I can make it to A-school by next summer.

Thanks again to both of you!
bobbleheadUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:11
bobblehead

--
09 May 2014 12:14 AM
Hi, I am scheduled to go to AET A school either this August, or October (dependent on holds) and i want to go the rotorwing route, but i was just curious how the whole air frame selection process goes... is that just part of your picks that you put in for? is it possible to switch down the road? If so, how hard is it to do that? also what were some of your guys' best stations? what are the pros and cons to each frame? obviously everyone will be biased towards their own frame but i'm curious what the general consensus is on them.
ejhcougarUser is Offline
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Send Private Message
Posts:562
ejhcougar

--
11 May 2014 05:35 PM
Bobblehead,

I am on the 60 side for tweets. As for your air frame selection, for us, you are ranked in your class. Then one day, the senior chief wrote all of the available billets on the board. They had the location and airframe with them and you just went from #1 down the list and chose. We had also filled out a dream sheet prior to that and if something on your dream sheet was on the board you had to pick it, other classes are a bit different. As for switching, it happens pretty frequently but the general trend is if you are on 60's its hard to switch off of them. From what I have seen, the fixed wing community is much more relaxed and laid back. They also can get qualified quicker. On the 60 side, people seem a little more tightly wound and are more anal about how things are approached. I'm not sure why this exists but it does. Getting qualified on a 60 is not an easy task. Its a matter of what you want to do, if you want to be a Flight Mechanic and hoist the swimmer and do the SAR, rotary wing is where its at. If you want to do more of an LE mission, find people, deal with sensors and mission systems, fixed wing is your route. If you have any questions feel free to ask or you can look me up in global.
DRolphUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:23
DRolph

--
16 Sep 2014 11:28 AM
Hey guys! I am shipping off to bootcamp in January 2015, and I have some serious interest in this rate. A quick background about myself, I am currently in a sophomore in community college and play college water polo. I have an interest in AST(probably like a lot of other young men joining the coast guard), but I also have an interest in AET. I took a couple physics classes in high school, so I have very limited knowledge of major electronic systems, but I am still interested and have an aptitude about learning new subjects. I have some questions regarding the day to day life as an AET as well as about "A" school. What kind of systems do AET's mainly work on? How often do they get to fly? Do AET's get more flight time on fixed wing aircraft or rotary wing aircraft, or does flight time vary by unit? Is there any preparation available for hopeful candidates? What kind of balance do candidates face in A school(i.e. physical vs. classroom)?
Max7049User is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:32
Max7049

--
13 Nov 2014 08:17 PM
So maybe this isn't the right place to post this but has anyone heard anything about the December 8th AET class? I know they don't always get orders out 6 weeks in advance but I'm starting to get a bit nervous. Thanks in advance for any replies.
Trvrh277User is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:2
Trvrh277

--
13 Jan 2015 09:39 AM
This question is for any current AET's. I am a non-rate at a small boat station out of boot. My name will be on the AET A school list shortly and I expect to wait at least 1.5 years. I plan to enroll in classes towards an electronics degree while I am waiting. I am looking for suggestions from PO's in the AET rating (Fixed wing or rotary) as to degrees that would have helped them from the start or degrees that perhaps you are now considering based on the work you have done and the work you will be doing.
camjohnson89User is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:29
camjohnson89

--
06 Feb 2015 07:39 PM
Hey Trvrh. I'm an AET3 a few months out of A school on C-130s. From what I've heard AET A school is one of the more difficult schools academically. Make sure you brush up on your math and problem solving skills before school. Also having a good basic understanding of electricity/electronics before school will certainly benefit you, but the instructors teach you pretty well. I bought and read Getting Started in Electronics from Radio Shack as per a suggestion posted in this forum and it definitely helped, but any basic electronics book should suffice. As for the degree you should get it all boils down to what you like or want to do. If you want to stand out amongst your peers and  you plan on making a career in the military and perhaps go the officer route it shouldn't matter too much the type of degree you get as long as you have one. As for a degree that's mostly related to the type of work we do I would say based on my little experience: Aviation Maintenance, Aeronautics, any engineering degree, Physics, Electronics. I would still go for a degree in a field that you enjoy most, or what you see yourself doing when you get out of the service. If you have any other questions feel free to find me in global and shoot me an email.
Trvrh277User is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:2
Trvrh277

--
06 Mar 2015 07:06 PM
AET3 I appreciate the response and the recommendations. If you don't mind I will reach out to you through global to get some information on school. Where are you stationed to make it easier to find you? Thank you again.  
jcrews1993User is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:1
jcrews1993

--
01 May 2015 01:20 AM
Is there a possible waiver for A school? I'm currently avionics in the USAF. I should be leaving for coast guard basic within the next month. Doing a RDP was out of the option for me for time purposes. My recruiter was not sure if such a thing, as a waiver, existed so I thought maybe someone on here would know.
Old Guard2User is Offline
Moderator / Trusted Member
Forum Supreme!
Forum Supreme!
Send Private Message
Posts:13798
Old Guard2

--
01 May 2015 05:24 AM
I don't know 100% but I would doubt it. You'll certainly have a leg up on everyone. But I think because of the different airframes you would need to attend CG A School to learn the specifics of CG avionics. Kinda sucks since you already have the knowledge but it also makes sense if you think about it. Would you wavy someone lateraling over to the AF from the CG and hopping right into fixing an F18 when all they've worked on are C130s???
Sector NY, Staten Island
ejhcougarUser is Offline
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Send Private Message
Posts:562
ejhcougar

--
02 May 2015 07:15 AM
Jcrews1993 there is no possibility of a waiver. We aren't just avionics either, we are electricians as well. Honestly, you probably wouldn't learn a whole lot at A school for AET because it is mostly theory and learning how to build wiring harnesses. The big thing you learn is how Coast Guard aviation works because it is a lot different than the other branches. We have mechanics and we have avionics/electrical guys, those are the only two specialties to aviation maintenance. Because of that broad knowledge base A school is very general, but its sometimes hard for prior service to really understand. The other thing is that E6 and below aviators are required to maintain their basic aircrew qualification as well meaning you have to be able to pass a flight physical and all of that in addition to all of the rating requirements. If you have questions I'm and AET, just send them over.
sbanaUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:6
sbana

--
13 Jul 2015 06:47 PM
How often do AET's go underway?
ejhcougarUser is Offline
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Send Private Message
Posts:562
ejhcougar

--
14 Jul 2015 04:18 PM
It depends on the airframe. The only airframe that gets underway is the H65. Even then, it's going to be a rotation of volunteers and competitive. I'm an H60 guy so I don't know their rotations. If getting underway is something you desire, aviation ratings aren't where you want to be.
Mongo556User is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:8
Mongo556

--
11 Jan 2016 07:57 AM
I"m interested in the airman rates, specifically aet. Does anyone know approximately how much of your time is spent on the ground at an air station, working on the aircraft, and how much time do you spend filing an air crew position in a helo or fixed wing? 



-MDB
AirDale13User is Offline
Trusted Member
Basic Member
Basic Member
Send Private Message
Posts:441
AirDale13

--
11 Jan 2016 03:48 PM
At a small air station, 3 60's, I would say I flew between 20-30 hours a month as a flight mechanic. 30 is a lot. As basic aircrew it can be as low as 4 hours per month. If you throw in hours to prepare for flight and inspecting your aircraft upon landing I would say approximately 40 hours a month altogether would be a good rough estimate.
UlyssesUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:21
Ulysses

--
07 May 2016 11:31 AM
Is there any age cutoff for A school? I am a 29 yo nonrate.
AirDale13User is Offline
Trusted Member
Basic Member
Basic Member
Send Private Message
Posts:441
AirDale13

--
07 May 2016 03:44 PM
No age cutoff for A School. There are age cutoffs for getting in the CG though.
BigFootSteppinUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:5
BigFootSteppin

--
18 Oct 2016 08:44 AM
Do you get any special pay for being an AET onto of your normal rate pay.
mkellyUser is Offline
Trusted Member
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Send Private Message
Posts:710
mkelly

--
18 Oct 2016 10:29 AM
You will get flight pay once you start your basic airman syllabus. You have to fly a minimum of 4 hours a month to continue to get the pay. As an AET, you do not get any extra pay. As a BA or FM(flight mechanic) you will get the flight pay.
BigFootSteppinUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:5
BigFootSteppin

--
18 Oct 2016 10:58 AM
By BA do you mean a bachelors? I have my associates and bachelors.
mkellyUser is Offline
Trusted Member
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Send Private Message
Posts:710
mkelly

--
18 Oct 2016 12:50 PM
No. I mean Basic Aircrew. When you get to your new unit the eventual goal is to have you stand flight mechanic duty. You have to get qualified to do that and there is a long road. First you'll have to get your ground/line crew qualified. After that you will get your post flight letter and then start working on your basic aircrew syllabus. You'll be learning all about the helicopter, radio calls...stuff like that for flying. After you get your BA(basic aircrew), you will start working on your flight mechanic syllabus. This is learning about hoisting and whatnot if you're in rotary wing. You'll be doing all of this while getting tweet work done. Its a busy 6 months to a year.
BigFootSteppinUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:5
BigFootSteppin

--
20 Oct 2016 03:36 PM
Posted By mkelly on 18 Oct 2016 01:50 PM
No. I mean Basic Aircrew. When you get to your new unit the eventual goal is to have you stand flight mechanic duty. You have to get qualified to do that and there is a long road. First you'll have to get your ground/line crew qualified. After that you will get your post flight letter and then start working on your basic aircrew syllabus. You'll be learning all about the helicopter, radio calls...stuff like that for flying. After you get your BA(basic aircrew), you will start working on your flight mechanic syllabus. This is learning about hoisting and whatnot if you're in rotary wing. You'll be doing all of this while getting tweet work done. Its a busy 6 months to a year.

Hmm interesting.

I attended Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and well versed in aircraft mechanics and actually plan on finishing my A&P (airframe and power plant) license while I'm in the Coast Guard. 

I saw that bootcamp no longer offers airman/airstations so I'm wondering what my best bet is to go about wanting to get an AET A-School. 

mkellyUser is Offline
Trusted Member
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Send Private Message
Posts:710
mkelly

--
20 Oct 2016 08:37 PM
As long as your ASVAB score is high enough, you can go to AET school from any unit. Your first unit has zero impact on what "A" school you go to. You can put your name on any list you qualify for.
UlyssesUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:21
Ulysses

--
03 Nov 2016 09:16 PM
Can anyone give an idea of the duty/travel schedule for AET, fixed v rotary? I hear some stories about having your bags packed to go two weeks on a C-130 if you get the call and stories of nothing more than day flights on duty. Thanks for any info.
mkellyUser is Offline
Trusted Member
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Send Private Message
Posts:710
mkelly

--
04 Nov 2016 07:41 AM
Duty is pretty much the same for a fixed and a rotary crew. Flights can be longer on a C-130 and 60 than a 65 but I've still had a couple of duty days where I have flown over 6 hours on a 65. Stories about packing your bags for 2 weeks is more for a deployment and it isn't really sprung on anybody last minute. Duty schedule varies from unit to unit, depending on how many duty standers are needed per day. I'm at a unit that has 2 ready crews at one time and we stand overnight duty around every 3 to 4 days. Some units stand a lot less duty than that.
the207lifeUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:8
the207life

--
02 Mar 2017 10:43 PM
Are there vision requirements for AET?
mkellyUser is Offline
Trusted Member
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Send Private Message
Posts:710
mkelly

--
03 Mar 2017 07:37 PM
https://www.uscg.mil/directives/cim/6000-6999/CIM_6410_3A.pdf

You can start by reading this. The eye stuff starts around page 1-7 I think.
StrixUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:11
Strix

--
19 May 2017 11:55 AM
Hi all.. again. Lol. So as my time at MEPS approaches, I have some questions about the rate that I am interested in.

1. What stations are available to AETs? Are their specific stations for fixed wing and rotary?

2. Do you "specialize" in a certain aircraft and are sent where that craft is employed?
A. If so, do you specialize by choice, or by wherever you are sent after A school?

3. If I go rotary, what is the job like? Are you on a boat for a long time? I've heard people explain 1 month on 1month off.. does that mean 1 month off the boat and on base, or 1 month off work ((seems unlikely))? Do you get to see many places on a boat? do you go to port often when out at sea?

4. What is the day like for fixed wing?

5. What are the flight opportunities like for both?

I think that's all for now.. lol.. I like that fixed wing doesn't deploy as much as rotary because I have a soon to be wife who I'm sure would be fine but still.. though I love the places you can go working with jayhawks and personally wouldn't mind a month at sea.


Pros and cons for both?
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Page 3 of 3 << < 123


Active Forums 4.3



Military clothing, gear, insignia, baseball caps and other quality items at SoldierCity


Disclaimer

This web site is a privately-owned and has not been underwritten or supported by the United States Coast Guard. 
The views and opinions posted by members do not reflect the views and opinions of the United States Coast Guard.
This is an informational site. Welcome aboard!

Copyright 2010 by USCG.ORG
United States Coast Guard Forums and Information  |  Terms Of Use  |  Privacy Statement