Register | Login
United States Coast Guard Forums and Information
The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,yacht,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States Coast Guard. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,travel,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion The World's Premiere Source for United States. Information and resources about the USCG, rules, regulations, policy, pay, jobs, forms, pay, locations, and more. auxiliary,faq,facts,manuals,boating rules,boating regulations,boating safety,inflatable boats, scuba diving,boating magazines,boats,boat talk,boaters,boats for sale,boating information,survey,cruising,cruiser,sea,ocean,tide,current,weather,marine,ships,inflatables,fishing,fisherman,cutter,boat navigation,wind,chart,navigator,powerboat,sailboat,sailing,opinion
ADHD and the Coast Guard
Last Post 12 Dec 2010 12:41 AM by Robinest58. 29 Replies.
Printer Friendly
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Sort:
PrevPrev NextNext
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages
Dougland89User is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:1
Dougland89

--
07 Jan 2007 01:40 AM
    I am 17 years old and i was diagnosed with ADHD this last October. I am currently taking Adderall XR for it and i understand if i continue with the medication i can no longer enlist in the Coast Guard.  If i stop taking the medication, and get a letter from my doctor saying i am no longer on it.  would i be able to join?  How longwould i have to be off of it?  I really want to join the coast guard and want this very badly.  Does anyone know any of my options?
    XShipRiderUser is Offline
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:1472
    XShipRider

    --
    08 Jan 2007 10:40 AM
    I recall a Flag Voice communique or an official message from some time ago rescinding the policy on ADD/ADHD and how it was to be handled for recruiting purposes. I'll search again today on my break to see if I can find an answer. Whatever I do find may only give you a point of contention with a recruiter.

    I'll be back.


    Caution: The author of this post is a product of the US public education system.

    ECU1229User is Offline
    New Member
    New Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:4
    ECU1229

    --
    13 May 2010 02:08 AM
    If someone is in the Coast Guard active duty for 3+ years and was diagnosed with ADHD. This person has never had a problem before and has been and excellent achiever. The military doctor also prescribed him with Adderall. He also attends college and has a 3.75 GPA. What is the policy on this? It seems like a gray area.
    weppropUser is Offline
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:3969
    wepprop

    --
    13 May 2010 02:14 AM
    Not so gray, actually. There is one list of conditions that disqualify you from joining. There is another list of conditions that you will be medically discharged for. They aren't the same list.

    It's no different than, say, the vision requirements to become a pilot vs the vision requirements to continue to fly. There are plenty of pilots that continue to fly (and fly well) even though a prospective pilot with the same vision would be disqualified from pilot training.
    ECU1229User is Offline
    New Member
    New Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:4
    ECU1229

    --
    13 May 2010 02:21 AM
    Will he be discharged or can he stay in? Also, can he just choose not to take the medicine. He obviously was doing okay before he was diagnosed.
    chuklesUser is Offline
    Trusted Member / Administrator
    Moderator
    Moderator
    Send Private Message
    Posts:2861
    chukles

    --
    13 May 2010 02:25 AM
    This is out of the scope of recruiting as a different set of standards apply. The individual in question will be able to discuss this issue with his/her primary care physician.


    Vr,
    Chuck

    These poor, plain men, dwellers upon the lonely sands of Hatteras, took their lives in their hands, and, at the most imminent risk crossed the most tumultuous sea…and all for what? That others might live to see home and friends. — Annual Report of the U.S. Life- Saving Service, 1885

    Recruiting Website

    Read here for answers to the most often asked questions about joining the Coast Guard!

    I, for one, welcome our new insect overlords. I'd like to remind them that as a trusted Coastie, I can be helpful in rounding up others to toil in their underground sugar caves.
    Old Guard2User is Offline
    Moderator / Trusted Member
    Forum Supreme!
    Forum Supreme!
    Send Private Message
    Posts:12361
    Old Guard2

    --
    13 May 2010 02:28 AM
    Reading Wep's response it sounds like it is a semi non-issue. He shouldn't be bounced for it. However, I believe refusing to take prescribed meds by a military doctor is not an acceptable thing. That is like refusing to follow an order. I would check in to that before just deciding not to take the meds.


    Proud mom of
    SN Robertson, Colin
    USCGC Seneca

    USCGC Midgett
    weppropUser is Offline
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:3969
    wepprop

    --
    13 May 2010 02:44 AM
    Even though I have some experience in this area as a parent, not being a doctor it would be foolish of me to issue a prognosis for someone else. Things will become clear in time.

    Again, not being a doctor and not knowing anything about the circumstances, I would never give medical advice other than to say that, in general, I would not advise someone in the military to disregard treatment prescribed by a military doctor.

    Obviously everything wasn't completely 'okay' or he would not have been examined by a doctor for a potential learning disability in the first place.
    CoochUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Moderator
    Moderator
    Send Private Message
    Posts:5303
    Cooch

    --
    13 May 2010 03:24 AM
    There are times when military doctors diagnose members with conditions that would have barred them from their original enlistment. Many of those members continue on in their careers. However, if you have some of the conditions before you come in, it is a disqualifying condition.


    "To me, clowns aren't funny. In fact, they're kinda scary. I've wondered where this started, and I think it goes back to the time I went to the circus and a clown killed my dad." - Deep Thought by Jack Handey

    You can meet the standard, or you can set the standard. It's your choice.
    CoochUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Moderator
    Moderator
    Send Private Message
    Posts:5303
    Cooch

    --
    13 May 2010 03:27 AM
    Dougland, to try and answer your original question:

    Your physician would have to be the one that takes you off the medication. You would have to be off of it for an entire year. At that point, the doctor would write a letter stating that he or she took you off of it, and that you have been off for at least one year and you no longer need it. MEPS may or may not ask for all school transcripts dating back to elementary school. I've had them do this for my applicants. That is the bare minumum just to get you approved to take a physical. It doesn't guarantee enlistment. Talk to your doctor and see what he or she thinks.


    "To me, clowns aren't funny. In fact, they're kinda scary. I've wondered where this started, and I think it goes back to the time I went to the circus and a clown killed my dad." - Deep Thought by Jack Handey

    You can meet the standard, or you can set the standard. It's your choice.
    weppropUser is Offline
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:3969
    wepprop

    --
    13 May 2010 03:31 AM
    Dougland89 posted once 3-1/2 years ago. Perhaps someone else will benefit from the answer....
    CoochUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Moderator
    Moderator
    Send Private Message
    Posts:5303
    Cooch

    --
    13 May 2010 03:33 AM
    Oops! I didn't even think to check the date on that. Nice catch!


    "To me, clowns aren't funny. In fact, they're kinda scary. I've wondered where this started, and I think it goes back to the time I went to the circus and a clown killed my dad." - Deep Thought by Jack Handey

    You can meet the standard, or you can set the standard. It's your choice.
    ECU1229User is Offline
    New Member
    New Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:4
    ECU1229

    --
    13 May 2010 03:35 AM
    Apparently, he just went in saying he was overwhelmed and was having a hard time concentrating. Then, they sent him to a civilian doctor who diagnosed him with with ADHD. I still feel this is a gray area when I read the personnel Manuel/medial Manuel.
    captkyguyUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:6687
    captkyguy

    --
    13 May 2010 03:40 AM
    I am not sure about the policy to stay in but I know the policy about getting in...it is an unwritten no go and easily supported by MEPS as "residual affects". Boy how I wish I had learned more about add and that doctor who diagnosed my son with ADD had (for a pg rating) a better idea then adderall, what a huge mistake that visit turned out to be.

    Not sure of the circumstances on the diagnosis but I sure would recommend a second and maybe third opinion and try everything else under the sun before add meds...steady exercise and a change of diet is where I would start.

    Jkribel (Jan) on the forum sent me this link a while back. I sure wish I had it a few years earlier before I git sucked into the whirlwind of the fix all adderall. You may find some helpful stuff on it.


    Kyle

     

    In his life changing name God Bless!

    I want to finally set it free, So show me how to see what Your mercy sees, Help me now to give what You gave to me...Forgiveness, Forgiveness
    captkyguyUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:6687
    captkyguy

    --
    13 May 2010 03:44 AM
    ECU1229 said...
    Apparently, he just went in saying he was overwhelmed and was having a hard time concentrating. Then, they sent him to a civilian doctor who diagnosed him with with ADHD. I still feel this is a gray area when I read the personnel Manuel/medial Manuel.
    Get a second and third opinion...ADD is an esay catch all and quick out for doctors...diet and exercise and I also would recommend this...

    https://www.juiceplus.com/nsa/content/Home.soa?site=jo01683 


    Kyle

     

    In his life changing name God Bless!

    I want to finally set it free, So show me how to see what Your mercy sees, Help me now to give what You gave to me...Forgiveness, Forgiveness
    CoochUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Moderator
    Moderator
    Send Private Message
    Posts:5303
    Cooch

    --
    13 May 2010 03:46 AM
    If the Coast Guard sent him to the doctor, and his situation is controllable by meds, there shouldn't be much reason for worry. Are they threatening to discharge him?


    "To me, clowns aren't funny. In fact, they're kinda scary. I've wondered where this started, and I think it goes back to the time I went to the circus and a clown killed my dad." - Deep Thought by Jack Handey

    You can meet the standard, or you can set the standard. It's your choice.
    captkyguyUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:6687
    captkyguy

    --
    13 May 2010 03:59 AM
    Cooch said...
    Dougland, to try and answer your original question:

    Your physician would have to be the one that takes you off the medication. You would have to be off of it for an entire year. At that point, the doctor would write a letter stating that he or she took you off of it, and that you have been off for at least one year and you no longer need it. MEPS may or may not ask for all school transcripts dating back to elementary school. I've had them do this for my applicants. That is the bare minumum just to get you approved to take a physical. It doesn't guarantee enlistment. Talk to your doctor and see what he or she thinks.
    Two letters from specialists in the field of psychiatry along with one one from the family doctor stating that he no longer had or showed signs of ADHD, also submitted an improved school transcript, was off meds for the required time and he had received approval from the surgeon general to process at MEPS...all to receive a PDQ for "residual affects" from the MEPS docs...

    No guarantee at all.

    Please do not play with this one if you are slightly interested in the military find another way to focus...diet and exercise...meds is not always the answer, it is just the easiest choice and a very bad one for some.

    Just stating a personal opinion you do not have to agree.


    Kyle

     

    In his life changing name God Bless!

    I want to finally set it free, So show me how to see what Your mercy sees, Help me now to give what You gave to me...Forgiveness, Forgiveness
    ECU1229User is Offline
    New Member
    New Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:4
    ECU1229

    --
    13 May 2010 03:59 AM
    Doe's he need the meds? No. Do they help? Yes. What should he do?
    CoochUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Moderator
    Moderator
    Send Private Message
    Posts:5303
    Cooch

    --
    13 May 2010 04:06 AM
    If he's already in, he doesn't need to worry, so long as his job performance isn't affected. It's a non-issue.


    "To me, clowns aren't funny. In fact, they're kinda scary. I've wondered where this started, and I think it goes back to the time I went to the circus and a clown killed my dad." - Deep Thought by Jack Handey

    You can meet the standard, or you can set the standard. It's your choice.
    jen899193User is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Moderator
    Moderator
    Send Private Message
    Posts:2519
    jen899193

    --
    13 May 2010 03:07 PM
    from what i have understood with this stuff....

    when someone is diagnosed with a medical condition that is normally disqualifying.....
    there will be an additional examination and it will be presented to the medical review
    board. britt has had to go through this process twice. outcome usually is determined from
    the reviewing medical officer's summary.


    Jen

    Proud Coastguard Mom of

    OS3 Church, Brittney R.
    Camslant Chesapeake, VA


    "Those who would give up essential liberty, to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." ~Benjamin Franklin





     

    ~Jen~
    husbandUser is Offline
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:528
    husband

    --
    16 May 2010 05:56 PM
    I heard that if you have ADHD in the Coas........OH LOOK!  Family Guy is on!

    Sorry, what were we talking about?



    I couldn't resist roll



    weppropUser is Offline
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:3969
    wepprop

    --
    16 May 2010 11:02 PM
    Squirrel!!!
    Robinest58User is Offline
    New Member
    New Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:4
    Robinest58

    --
    11 Dec 2010 03:40 AM
    I am the Mother of a son who has been in the Coast Guard for 5 years and doing very well. He was diagnosed with ADHD in grade school and so am I, I take meds for it and have done so for years.  My son left the state for a couple of years before joining the Coast Guard. He didn't take it those those two years because he had no insurance. He was able to get a letter from his former doctor saying he was functioning without it. And he has since it is a structured environment, but when he is on leave, he misses planes, appointments, lost so many wallets he has lost count etc and gets frustrated. I heard the air force is now letting pilots take anti-depressants.I would like the person guiding my boat or plane to have everything he needs for him to be healthy and have a clear brain, perhaps this would help some of the "self-medication" we know some pilots have done.  Some of us are not lucky that the chemicals are not acting the way they should and when meds have been proven to help we should not be denied them. That is ridiculous. I am an ex-police officer-they did not ask this ridiculous requirement.  And I am a retired teacher so I know both sides of this story and I totally disagree with the USCG on this policy. They should want their recruits at 100% functioning. I know as one who takes these meds how awful it is not to be able to take them and what a fog I am in. I have seen parents put their children on much needed medcinine after much research, doctors diagnoses and teacher observation as well as testing. I have personally seen their aptitude test scores rise from 20 percentile to 80 percentile only to have their parents take them off it later. Mostly because of THEIR pride they didn't want their kid to be "different" thinking that reflected on them! Many of those that happened to gave up and dropped out of school. That should be abuse as much as withhholding insulin. You don't know what it is like unless you have been there and done that and I have been on both sides! Get with the 21st century USCG and be glad we live in the medical  and science age we do that has made so many advances. 
    GearsUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Moderator
    Moderator
    Send Private Message
    Posts:6532
    Gears

    --
    11 Dec 2010 07:40 AM
    The issue arises when an asset is deployed for long durations. If the person in question requires a medication, any medication, that they can't access due to an extended deployment that person could put themselves and their shipmates in danger. I always want my crew at 100%, having a crew member require a prescription to maintain equilibrium creates an unnecessary risk.
    “I’m not in this world to live up to your expectations and you’re not in this world to live up to mine.” ― Bruce Lee
    Robinest58User is Offline
    New Member
    New Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:4
    Robinest58

    --
    11 Dec 2010 05:12 PM
    Glad God made you 100% perfect, don't know unless you have been there and done that.
    southern118User is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:2716
    southern118

    --
    11 Dec 2010 05:53 PM
    he isnt busting your chops mam.

    he is just stating a fact. What happens if someone has to be on a med and there boat is on a deployment and they get extended somewhere an extra two months without those meds then you have problems. I can see where the standard is and understand it. The accession standard is different then the standard there is to stay in. Why bring someone in that you are going to have to pay for things that are out of the oridanary. I dont know how much the meds are but think about it this way you have a recruit that comes in and needs a special med that is 400 a month to provide him with it as most of our meds are free. that is 4800 a year so that is 19200 dollars in his enlistment if he only does 4 years. if he does twenty years you are looking at 96000 dollars. now why spend an extra MILLION DOLLARS on one person that there is another person that isnt going to cost you that
    newmsUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:161
    newms

    --
    11 Dec 2010 05:57 PM

    Robinest58,

    I've reread your post several times now and I'm still unsure of your argument.  From what I've gathered from the older posts and from reading enlistment disqualifications, the USCG via MEPS prescreens its applicants' medical histories for things like ADD/ADHD (among several other things).  In Laymans Terms, the USCG (and most other branches) does not want to see a history of sustained medication pertaining to ADD/ADHD which suggests a reliance on these medications - and this is where GEARS makes a very valid point.

    But the older topic below talks about a situation in which a current service member may be diagnosed and treated for ADD/ADHD via medication - a diagnoses and treatment that would be completely Disqualifying if the service member were a civilian trying to apply for initial enlistment.  The only tricky situation would be if the ADD/ADHD diagnoses/treatment were impeding the service members work performance.

    We can't have pilots flying emergency operations for several hours and be worried that they will have a lapse of concentration because they haven't had the opportunity to take their prescribed medication for the day.
    newms! PATFORSWA
    GearsUser is Offline
    Trusted Member
    Moderator
    Moderator
    Send Private Message
    Posts:6532
    Gears

    --
    11 Dec 2010 10:47 PM
    Glad God made you 100% perfect, don't know unless you have been there and done that.


    There are conditions far more debilitating than ADHD that people have to overcome.
    “I’m not in this world to live up to your expectations and you’re not in this world to live up to mine.” ― Bruce Lee
    Robinest58User is Offline
    New Member
    New Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:4
    Robinest58

    --
    11 Dec 2010 11:59 PM
    Robinest58User is Offline
    New Member
    New Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:4
    Robinest58

    --
    12 Dec 2010 12:41 AM
    Yea, I personally know there are much more serious health issues to overcome. In the last 12 years I have had 10  major operations, one which was botched up and caused permanent nerve damage. I cared for my Father the 6 years with the help of my husband My Father was  a WWII airplane bomber pilot, and I watched the disease of Alzheimers take away the memory of this man a little at a time each day for those 6 years Recent memories were lost yet he always retained the memories of proudly serving his country. He passed away last year at our home at age 87. This man who flew missions for out country could no longer find his way around the yard. It was like losing a little of him at a time.  His brother died a few weeks ago at almost age 90 and did not have perfect eyesight and served 4 years as a glider pilot and instructor. (Never could understand the different requirements for that one.) He flew successful rescue missions to France several times. We are losing more and more WWII vets each day  and need to give the respect they deserve for serving our country willingly.We also need to stand behind more medical research for all diseases and not dismiss some just because we don't understand them. May God continue to bless you, I admire you for serving our country and know what it is like to serve in law enforcement and public education. for over 25 years. Both were cut short because of my health and an unfortunate mistakes a physician made that caused my disability. Unfortunately they have just found out officially what happened to me and have a name for it after 9 years. And there are only 3 physicians in the U.S,A. who perform a surgery to fix the nerves that I had damaged and that is a 50 50 chance. So I am bypassing that for now. God Bless our Troops!
    You are not authorized to post a reply.


    Active Forums 4.3



    Military clothing, gear, insignia, baseball caps and other quality items at SoldierCity


    Disclaimer

    This web site is a privately-owned and has not been underwritten or supported by the United States Coast Guard. 
    The views and opinions posted by members do not reflect the views and opinions of the United States Coast Guard.
    This is an informational site. Welcome aboard!

    Copyright 2010 by USCG.ORG
    United States Coast Guard Forums and Information  |  Terms Of Use  |  Privacy Statement