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Juniper Class
Last Post 23 Jan 2013 10:29 PM by Cooch. 16 Replies.
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TJE6754User is Offline
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TJE6754

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25 Dec 2010 03:56 PM
    Graduated Cape May 22 Dec. Orders are to a Juniper class buoy tender. I would appreciate any advice or insights anyone may have as to what to expect. Thanks a lot.
    ltateUser is Offline
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    ltate

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    26 Dec 2010 04:38 PM
    Congratulations on your graduation and good luck with your first assignment! Which buoy tender are you headed to? My daughter worked on a Juniper 225 up in Alaska for about 18 months after boot camp....the Hickory homeported in Homer. She seemed to really like the work. It can be dirty, wet, cold and all that stuff but the crew was pretty tight....only about 40 people onboard....and they all got along really well. One thing I thought was kinda nice was they almost always knew where they were going and when. They had a schedule of certain buoys they needed to work on, land aids they needed to maintain and things like that. They'd occasionally get called out on a SAR case but for the most part, they knew ahead of time when they were getting underway and how long they'd be gone. Anyway, if you'd like more info, send me a private message. My daughter doesn't post here but I might be able to get more info from her. And just alittle bit of extra info....she went through five pairs of boots while she was there so that might give you an idea how sloppy the work can be. : )

    Laurie
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    TJE6754

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    27 Dec 2010 11:28 AM
    Thanks for the info. Im going to CGC Hollyhock, Port Huron, MI.
    ltateUser is Offline
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    ltate

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    27 Dec 2010 12:57 PM
    That's very cool. I'm sure you'll enjoy your time in Port Huron. Have you ever been there? We actually used to live there and it's a beautiful area. Lots of stuff to see and do. We lived in a home right on the St. Clair River just south of the Blue Water Bridge, which connects Port Huron with Sarnia, Ontario. My kids were pretty young then but still had a blast running out on the deck every time we heard a freighter or other type of ship going by. I imagine with all the shipping traffic they have in that area, there will be alot of buoys and stuff to maintain. It's probably pretty similar to the buoy work in Alaska, at least in winter....cold, wet, icy and everything else! At least your summer will be alittle warmer than AK, if you're still there. Best of luck to you!

    Laurie
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    USCGBound05

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    12 Jan 2011 02:15 PM
    Congrats on the Hollyhock, heard from others it's a great spot, please keep us updated how everything goes!
    Browns24User is Offline
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    Browns24

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    12 Jan 2011 02:31 PM
    I just had a good buddy of mine get off the Hollyhock to go to A school. He enjoyed the work, the labor hours that are put into doing the bouy's and the trips to Canada!! It's a very rewarding assignment when your out on the water all night long working the bouy's, there's a sense of accomplishment. Hard work, but a good first unit.
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    13 Jan 2011 04:07 AM
    I was on BRAMBLE out of Port Huron from 1980-83. Port Huron was a nice town to be stationed in. Detroit was close enough for concerts but far enough away to avoid whenever desired. It's nice to have a major airport so close too. Sarnia, Ontario, Canada is right across the Blue Water Bridge. That too was nice, though you'll need travel credentials these days. Port Huron to me was just big enough to provide pretty much anything you could want in a small city. The old OPAREA was from just north of Alpena, Michigan, all of Saginaw Bay and River down to Belle, Isle at Detroit. We had buoy depots everywhere so most aids were kept nearby. Several lighthouses to maintain in that area too. We had our own trailerable aids to navigation boat (TANB) which we used for smaller aids and for quick lamp swaps. The BRAMBLE had a crew of around 50. I know the new Juniper class are much more lean and efficient. They can also set aids much faster thanks to GPS. We had three quartermasters standing back-to-back on the flying bridge shooting angles on fixed shore points using sextants. It often took several rounds of shooting angles while the OOD tried to position the ship into the proper location. "Shoot 'em again!" was oft shouted by the OOD. Ouch. The nice thing about being on a buoy tender, true working ships, is you can see at the end of any given day the results of your work. Enjoy your time. Though it is long hard days some days, you'll look back on it as some of your very best times in the service (or that is my hope anyway). -X
    USCGBound05User is Offline
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    USCGBound05

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    04 Mar 2011 08:17 AM
    How's it going bud? any new updates?
    LauraDKUser is Offline
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    LauraDK

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    21 Jan 2013 11:59 AM
    Hey,
    I'm going Yeoman and I know we get stationed on a lot of 255 buoy tenders. My questions are: What exactly does a yeoman DO on the boat? Do they work on deck with the crew or are they below doing desk work? When the boat is in port, does the yeoman still report to the boat for day working or does she go to an office? Any input is appreciated. Thanks.
    "Zombieland Rule #32- Enjoy the little things."
    BellsUser is Offline
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    Bells

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    21 Jan 2013 02:21 PM
    Similar to your other thread, as a yoeman you are going to be doing yoeman work. You might stand bridge watch additionally. Then, inport, you are still connected with the ship so you work on the ship.
    Take what you like and leave the rest behind.
    JBjuniorUser is Offline
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    JBjunior

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    21 Jan 2013 05:42 PM
    Also, not sure that YN are stationed on there "a lot." There are only 17 and each one only has one YN. Factor in pay grade, tour length, and assignment cycles and you may never have the opportunity to be on one. I wouldn't focus on that too much.
    GearsUser is Offline
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    Gears

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    22 Jan 2013 08:37 AM
    Also, assignments out of "A" school are purely luck of the draw. Even if a 225' is available you'll be competing with your classmates for the assignment.
    “I’m not in this world to live up to your expectations and you’re not in this world to live up to mine.” ― Bruce Lee
    JBjuniorUser is Offline
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    JBjunior

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    22 Jan 2013 06:30 PM
    Posted By Gears on 22 Jan 2013 09:37 AM
    Also, assignments out of "A" school are purely luck of the draw. Even if a 225' is available you'll be competing with your classmates for the assignment.

    That won't happen anyway.  It is a YN2 billet, possibly a YN1 billet for OCONUS boats.  I know that they turn the HS2 billet to an HS1 OCONUS because of it being independent duty and OCONUS, they may do the same thing for YN.
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    Gears

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    22 Jan 2013 07:24 PM
    Good to know. Thanks, sir!
    “I’m not in this world to live up to your expectations and you’re not in this world to live up to mine.” ― Bruce Lee
    CoochUser is Offline
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    Cooch

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    22 Jan 2013 08:32 PM
    I know a couple of them that had to shortfill the billet with A school students. The Hollyhock had a brand new SK come out of A school even though it's a SK2 billet. It all depends on the circumstances and how hard it is to fill certain billets.
    You can meet the standard, or you can set the standard. It's your choice.
    JBjuniorUser is Offline
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    JBjunior

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    23 Jan 2013 10:14 PM
    Posted By Cooch on 22 Jan 2013 09:32 PM
    I know a couple of them that had to shortfill the billet with A school students. The Hollyhock had a brand new SK come out of A school even though it's a SK2 billet. It all depends on the circumstances and how hard it is to fill certain billets.

    Crazy that anyone that had the chance would turn it down compared to other sea duty opportunities.
    CoochUser is Offline
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    Cooch

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    23 Jan 2013 10:29 PM
    Completely agreed. If I had to do it all over again, I'd have taken a 225 when I left the 378.
    You can meet the standard, or you can set the standard. It's your choice.
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